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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Computer and Technology Exams-Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: consider and apply many considerations that must be applied to the interface and screen design process; describe rationale and rules for an effective interface design methodology; identify the components of interfaces and screens, including windows, menus, and controls; design and organize interfaces to encourage the fastest and most accurate comprehension and execution of screen features; choose screen colors and design screen icons and graphics; and perform the user interface design process, including interface development and testing.
Instruction:
This self-study course focuses on designing functional Web pages and applications utilizing proper interface design techniques. Topics include: techniques used in designing interactive functions involved in typical e-commerce and e-learning applications, human factors and accessible Web pages. This course presents the important practical guidelines for good interface and screen design. The guidelines reflect a mix of human behavior, science, and art, and are organized within the context of the interface design process.
Credit recommendation:
In the lower division associate/baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Information Systems, Information Technology, or Web Design (12/14).
Location:
Various; distance learning format
Length:

Varies (self study; self-paced).

Dates:

January 2015- Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate competence in understanding how technological systems work and operate effectively; demonstrate selecting technology, which includes determining desired outcomes and applicable constraints.; demonstrate competence in applying technology to tasks; design and implement an application to solve business problems; and identify appropriate technology to solve business problems.

Instruction:

This is a self-study course that is assessed by a final examination. Dynamic Web Design and Development is a self-study course building upon the principles introduced in the lower level courses. This course covers advanced navigational organization, selection, web page layouts, and embedding multimedia to enhance web sites. Other topics include: advanced concepts of dynamic media, interactive Web sites., gaming, ActionScript, and issues involved in generating and delivering content in a dynamic way. This class explores how to connect the front end (the Flash application) with dynamic data on the server. This course of study is necessary to be prepared for the final examination, which consists of reading, study guide and crash course video supplements.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Computer Information Systems, Information Systems, Information Technology, Information Technology Management, Web Design or Digital Media (1/15).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

June 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the exam, students will be able to: describe the function and purpose of computer hardware components and important application software; evaluate major operating systems; illustrate the major telecommunications alternatives and evaluate their suitability for a given task; compare and contrast Local Area Networks and Wide Area Networks; propose and evaluate solutions to data communication problems; and distinguish between the important programming languages and choose the correct computer language for the specific job.

Instruction:

Introduction to Computers (CIS-101) introduces students to the principles of information processing and computers. Students differentiate between the concepts of hardware and software and their uses in information systems. The exam traces the development of computers from their historical background to modern times and the role computers have in modern society. Special focus is given to computer operations and systems, as well as terminology.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate /associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Information Systems or Information Technology (6/17).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain how data is represented in a computer; demonstrate knowledge of computer hardware and software; demonstrate knowledge of computer networks; design, implement and execute algorithms; explain social, ethical and legal issues arising from the use of computers; discuss future uses of computers; discuss computer usage in interdisciplinary fields; demonstrate knowledge of software applications such as electronic spreadsheets and databases; use a web browser to search the Internet; use computer terminology in written documents and oral communication; use computer etiquette in electronic communications; and use communication tools effectively.
Instruction:

This self-study course provides a broad introduction to the use of computers as tools for creativity, communications, organizing information, and problem-solving. The basic concepts of computer hardware, software, networking, and the Internet are covered. Organization of a typical Personal Computer (PC) is examined in a given popular operating systems environment. Terminology and concepts related to major PC hardware components and their functions are discussed consistent with industry standards and practices. Some typical user interface of popular operating systems are introduced. Topics include: current state, trends, and challenges of various aspects of computing: computer hardware and software, and programming languages.

Credit recommendation:
In the lower division associate/baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Information Systems, Information Technology, or Web Design (12/14).
Location:
Various; distance learning format
Length:

Varies (self study; self-paced).

Dates:

January 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: develop client side web pages using HTML5 and CSS3 source code that is both readable and upholds current standards; create basic HTML elements such as hyperlinks, images, tables, and forms; use latest web technologies and programming languages to structure a web page effectively; control display and formatting characteristics for web page designs using Cascading Style Sheets; demonstrate knowledge of box properties and external style sheets to build portable, accessible, responsive web sites that present information with clarity and appeal; and compare and contrast user interactions between desktop web, mobile application, and mobile web.

Instruction:

Introduction to HTML5 and CSS3 is a self-study course introduces students to the principles of creating a web site from scratch using HTML5 (the latest HTML standard) and CSS3, (the latest CSS standard). This course leads students through the entire web site creation process, while developing and enhancing HTML, CSS, and visual design skills along the way. Students learn how to create accessible web sites that allow users to easily and quickly navigate through information, regardless of browser type, connection speed, or browsing device. Students also explore the principles of responsive design, a new method of designing web sites that adapt to devices ranging from mobile phones to desktop monitors. Whether building a site from scratch or redesigning an existing site, the principles presented in this course help students deliver their web content in a more responsive, accessible, and visually exciting way. Specifically, with HTML5 it is possible to develop web pages entirely with HTML5 and CSS3. There is no need for “plug‐ins” to provide additional functionality. The course of study is necessary to be prepared for the final examination, which consists of reading, study guide and crash course video supplements.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Information Systems, Information Technology, or Web Design, Web Programming, or Internet Programming (1/15).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
July 2013 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: create Access databases and populate them to relevant data; query databases by various criteria and create forms for queries; perform basic calculations and statistics within queries; maintain Access databases by updating records, filtering records, setting validation rules, changing the appearance of data sheets and making mass changes within databases; create reports and forms generated from information in Access databases; generate multi-table forms and manipulate these forms using various techniques; utilize advanced Access reporting techniques to manipulate Access reports and forms in a variety of ways; use Structured Query Language (SQL) to manage data relating to Access databases in a variety of ways.
Instruction:

This self-study course covers functions and features of Microsoft Access 2010. Students study database concepts and the Access environment and learn how to design and create databases. Major topics include: tables, fields, and records, sorting and filtering data, setting field properties and data entry rules, creating queries, forms, and reports.

Credit recommendation:
In the lower division associate/baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Computer Applications, Information Management, Information Systems, or as General Elective (8/13).
Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
July 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: create worksheets and present them in different ways showing various fonts, styles, sizes, colors, etc.; use the power of Excel to automatically calculate mathematical data and apply it seamlessly to spreadsheets; copy cells and ranges of cells and perform other complex manipulations of spreadsheets, including adding charts, subtables, etc.; perform financial functions and data tables to produce amortization schedules and use Excel's formula checking function to minimize the possibility of error; create, sort, and query tables and the data within them; work with multiple worksheets and separate workbooks; and create templates by working with other features such as art, images, and screenshots to work these features into an Excel spreadsheet.

Instruction:

This self-study comprehensive course covers all the functions and features of Excel 2010 for students of any skill level. Major topics include: introduction to spreadsheet terminology, Excel's components, entering and editing text, values, formulas, and pictures, absolute and relative references, ranges, rows, and columns, advanced formatting options, lookup functions, data validation, database functions, and using simple and complex formulas to assist with calculations.

Credit recommendation:
In the lower division associate/baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Computer Applications, Information Management, Information Systems, or as General Elective (8/13).
Location:
Various, distance Learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
July 2013 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: create and edit PowerPoint presentations with a variety of elements; enhance presentations with pictures, shapes, clip art, etc.; add multimedia elements to improve the effectiveness of PowerPoint presentations; work information graphics into PowerPoint presentations; collaborate with others in preparing and delivering PowerPoint presentations; integrate PowerPoint presentations with elements linking them to other media by using hyperlinks and action buttons; and create self-running presentations containing animations.
Instruction:
This self-study course covers the most important functions and features of Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 for students of any skill level, beginning with an Introduction to PowerPoint's components. Students will learn how to create, save, and rearrange presentations. Major topics include: formatting slides, using graphics and multimedia, customizing Smart Art graphics and tables, modifying and distributing presentations, action buttons, custom slide shows and equations, and integrating Microsoft Office files.
Credit recommendation:
In the lower division associate/baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Computer Applications, Information Management, Information Systems, or as General Elective (8/13).
Location:
Various, distance Learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
July 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: create various types of documents through Microsoft Word; insert headers, footers, footnotes, endnotes, etc. into a word document to maximize the professional look of the document; produce and use templates, form letters, mailing labels, and directories; use Word features to collaborate on documents with co-workers; create and make changes to title pages, tables of contents, lists, letterheads, and various other in-document features; and create templates for online forms and enhance those forms using macros and other relevant features.

Instruction:
This self-study course familiarizes students with the Microsoft Word program and provides a variety of features available in the application as well as strategies to maximize productivity. By learning the essentials of the program, students learn how to produce, edit, format, view, display, and print documents such formal letters, business presentations, and research papers.
Credit recommendation:
In the lower division associate/baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Computer Applications, Information Management, Information Systems, or as General Elective (8/13).
Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

December 2014 - Present.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe and discuss the theory and concepts involved in the design of web pages; demonstrate the use of various tools and techniques, including HTML, XHTML, and Internet Explorer and employ current web browser, text editing, and graphics composition skills to design and develop interactive web pages; differentiate between what makes an effective and a poorly designed web page and be able to critically evaluate them; use a professional Website Development tool (Adobe Dreamweaver CS6); use various tools and techniques, including FTP and Internet Explorer and employ current web browser, text editing, graphics composition skills to design and develop an interactive web page for a client; and identify what should be done to effectively communicate to a target audience through web pages.
Instruction:
This self-study course focuses on designing functional Web pages and applications utilizing proper interface design techniques. Topics include: techniques used in designing interactive functions involved in typical e-commerce and e-learning applications, human factors and accessible Web pages. This course presents the important practical guidelines for good interface and screen design. The guidelines reflect a mix of human behavior, science, and art, and are organized within the context of the interface design process.
Credit recommendation:
In the lower division associate/baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Science, Information Systems, Information Technology, or Web Design (12/14).

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