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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Business Exams-Coopersmith Career Consulting

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced)

Dates:

August 2017 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define the communication process and explain the importance of effective business communication; explain how diversity in organizations affects business communications; identify techniques and strategies for improving interpersonal communications; describe social media tools and explain how they are changing the nature of business communications; explain how computer technologies are used for communicating in the business environment, including word processing, spreadsheets, databases, email, and presentation software); evaluate business messages, reports, and proposals; and develop and deliver oral presentations.

Instruction:

This course provide students with knowledge and skills to effectively communicate in global business environments. Students identify and use computer technologies and social media tools for conducting interpersonal communications with diverse organizations. Additionally, students develop and evaluate both written and oral business communications.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Communications, Cultural Studies, Arts, Education or College Success (8/17). NOTE: Completion of four writing assignments, one audio/visual presentation and a final examination, as outlined in the course syllabus, is a requirement for students who want to access credit recommendations.

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
September 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: outline the organizational management structures typical for most organizations; assist in planning and strategic management of organizations; propose methods by which organizational decisions can be made in a variety of circumstances; define and explain the concept of entrepreneurship and specific problems that arise in the course of new venture management; describe issues that typically arise during the process of organizational change and innovation; identify and help solve issues that arise in managing human resources and the behavior of individuals within an organization; propose ideas that would help motivate employees to improve their performance; explain the importance of leadership and influence processes to the performance of organizations; outline the importance of communication in organizations and steps that could be taken to improve the same; and prescribe steps that may be taken to improve the managing of groups and teams, the control process and operations, and quality and productivity.

Instruction:
This self-study course examines fundamental management concepts and managerial responsibilities in both formal and informal organizational structures by providing students with a foundation of management principles. Major topics include: planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and staffing.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management or Business (9/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:

Various, distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss the historical and present day importance of Human Resources Management (HRM) and its related subcategories; utilize, identify, and describe the theories of HRM and apply theories to practical organizational occurrences; identify and demonstrate appropriate HRM terminology when discussing the discipline; critically analyze the importance of micro, meso, and macro level job analysis; convey the importance of HRM compliance in relationship to laws, regulations, and diversity; compare and contrast the importance of training and development; explain and conceptualize the components associated with compensation and benefits; and apply legal knowledge related to organizational governance to “real world” situations.

Instruction:

This course provides students with an introductory overview of the topic of Human Resource Management (HRM) and focuses on the study of various components supporting strategic functionality of an organization.  Throughout this course, an array of topics related to HRM are explored.  Such topics include, but are not limited to: the law, governance, and employee rights, organizational diversity, staffing, employee development, compensation and benefits, international HRM.  This course begins with an introduction to the historical and present-day role of HRM, including relevant vocabulary used in the field.  Once a foundational knowledge is attained, students begin to explore the role that subtopics of the discipline play in an organization’s success.&

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Resource Management, Management, Operations Management, Business Communications, or Entrepreneurship (8/18).

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

Version 1: September 2013 - July 2018. Version 2: August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify national differences in politics and culture; illustrate the effects of ethics on international business; explain international trade theory; describe the political economy of international business; outline the effect of foreign direct investment; discuss examples of regional economic integration; demonstrate how the foreign exchange markets work; identify and explain the roles of the international monetary system and global capital markets; show various strategies and organizational structures in international businesses; identify and choose the appropriate entry strategy and necessary strategic alliances given a fact set; lay out the details and differences between exporting, importing, and counter trade; show how global production, outsourcing, and logistics affect the international marketplace; explain how cultural and national differences affect global marketing and Research and Development; and account for international business using various countries as stakeholders.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This self-study course provides an introduction to International Business and explores pros and cons of economic theories, government policies, business strategies and organizational structures in the global business world. Emphasis focuses on differences in economies, differing ethical issues facing today's executives and how politics play a large role in international commerce. Students learn about global trade and investment strategy with particular importance placed on the global monetary system, the strategy and structure of the international business environment while exploring the actual operational practices, managerial implications of each topic on the actual practice of international business, and the opportunities and risks associated with conducting business on a global basis.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in International Business or Business (9/13). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in International Business or Business (8/18 revalidation). 

Location:
Various, distance learning format.
Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:
September 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the importance of managing profitable customer relationships; identify steps  important in partnering to build customer relationships; assist in managing marketing relationships; read and interpret trends in consumer and business buying behavior from given statistics; define segmentation, targeting, and positioning and explain their importance in marketing; assist in the construction of product, services, and branding strategy; determine the relevant factors to be considered during new product development; identify pricing considerations and strategies important in marketing products; assist in determining which marketing channels are likely to be effective in marketing a given product under a specific scenario; help manage advertising, sales promotion, and public relations; and describe and define key features that exist in marketing over the internet and marketing through other media.

Instruction:
This self-study course examines fundamental principles, problems, and practices of marketing by providing students with a foundation of marketing principles including product, price, placement, and promotion. Special focus is on the functions of marketing and the relationship to the production and distribution of goods and services that are ultimately purchased by the consumer.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Marketing, Management, or Business (9/13) (8/18 revalidation).

Location:

Various, distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

June 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss major macroeconomic issues of growth, unemployment and inflation; identify and measure economic growth, define, measure, and compare GDP; follow unemployment data via the business cycle; describe the effects of aggregate demand and aggregate supply fluctuations in relation to macroeconomic equilibrium; compare and contrast varied macroeconomics models, including the classic growth, neoclassical, and new growth theories; identify and discuss the underlying causes of inflation and describe the effects of demand-pull and cost-push inflation; use the Philips curve to describe the relationship between inflation and unemployment in the short and long run; identify and discuss the role of the Federal Reserve Bank and monetary policy; and discuss the impacts of governmental budgets and fiscal policy and taxes on saving and investment.

Instruction:

This is an introductory course in Macroeconomics for students with no prior background in Economics. The instructional approach is mainly non-quantitative, but graphical analysis is covered. Students learn basic macroeconomic concepts on the aggregate demand and aggregate supply of outputs in the general economy, economic growth and unemployment, and the role of money and banking institutions in affecting the economy’s price level and inflation. Students study various fiscal and monetary policies used by the government to stabilize economic fluctuations. The analytical tools learned in this course are useful in understanding and examining many real world economic problems affecting the general economy. Instruction is offered in the form of a course syllabus and study guide, an assigned textbook with reading assignments, a PowerPoint study guide and provided audio/visual presentations. Students are expected to complete the course of study set forth in the syllabus to properly prepare for the final examination. Some background in college algebra and/or statistics is required. Prerequisite: Some background in college algebra and/or statistics is required.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Marketing, Finance, Economics, Human Resources, or as a general elective (6/16).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

June 2017 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the exam, sstudents will be able to: identify the organization of information systems in general and their roles of the modern organization in a web-based environment; describe how businesses generally use information systems; assist in the management of both data and knowledge in managing an organization; describe the infrastructure of the information technology system; discuss the roles of e-businesses and e-commerce in today’s business environment; determine the extent to which wireless and mobile computing must be taken into account when managing an organization’s delivery of information over the internet; explain the method by which information systems can be acquired and applied; and manage information systems in a manner that takes into account ethical and social issues; especially those unique to the information age.

Instruction:

This exam is an introduction to Information Technology and its applications to the business world. Students explore issues with conducting business in a web-based environment and how to achieve a competitive advantage with a successful digital information system. Emphasis is on information technology infrastructure with additional focus on wireless and mobile computing. Students explore the building and management of systems, from both the organizational and managerial perspective. The exam is designed to provide students with a strong understanding of information systems and the enormous importance they hold in today’s business world.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate /associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management Information Systems (6/17).

Location:

Various, distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

June 2016 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the concept of scarcity and determine why people consider opportunity costs; describe the laws of supply and demand, pricing systems and be able to calculate price elasticity; identify the central elements of the theory of public choice; discuss the differences between long-term and short-term economic choices; compare multiple forms of competition, including monopolies, oligopolies, and perfect competition; discuss the role the government plays in the economy; demonstrate knowledge of influencing factors in microeconomics, including income differences and health care; define “externalities” and discuss how they affect economic and social decision-making.

Instruction:

This is an introductory course in microeconomics for students who have no prior background in economics. The instructional approach is mainly non-quantitative, but graphical analysis is covered. Students learn the basic concepts on the demand and supply of goods, the economic behaviors of households and firms and their interactions, and market structures. Students study situations where a competitive market fails to function efficiently and the ways to deal with them. At the end of the course, students should have acquired basic analytical tools useful for a variety of economic problems in our daily lives. Instruction is offered in the form of a course syllabus and study guide, an assigned textbook with reading assignments, a PowerPoint study guide and provided audio/visual presentations. Students are expected to complete the course of study set forth in the syllabus to properly prepare for the final examination. Some background in college algebra and/or statistics is required. Prerequisite: Some background in college algebra and/or statistics is required.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Marketing, Finance, Economics, Human Resources, or as a general elective (6/16).

Location:

Various, distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced).

Dates:

June 2016 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the various factors that influence organizational behavior, including diversity of backgrounds of the members, emotions, moods, personalities and values; identify the factors that can influence the perceptions held by members of an organization and methods by which perception can be altered; assist in the development and application of motivational strategies that can be employed to improve performance in an organizational setting; distinguish between the different types of organizational communication, including formal, informal, upward, downward and lateral communication and identify strategies for improving communications within organizations; compare and contrast leadership and management and determine the characteristics that make successful managers and leaders; identify the bases of power within an organization and tactics that can be used within an organization to increase power and influence; and describe the manner in which organizational culture is established and the characteristics of organizational culture that can improve or hurt organizational performance.

Instruction:

This course is a study of behavior in organizations and influences of individual, group, and organizational processes on performance. The course covers a variety of topics, including: the processes of making and implementing decisions, effective communication in an organizational environment and the dynamics of office and organizational politics. Other concepts deal with motivation, solving conflicts, interpersonal communication and creating and maintaining positive organizational cultures and environments. Instruction is offered in the form of a course syllabus and study guide, an assigned textbook with reading assignments, a PowerPoint study guide and provided audio/visual presentations. Students are expected to complete the course of study set forth in the syllabus to properly prepare for the final examination. Prerequisite: Some background (including one or more college-level courses) in psychology is strongly recommended. One or more courses in college-level English and/or sociology are helpful.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Marketing, Finance, Economics, Human Resources, or as a general elective (6/16).

Location:

Various, distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study; self-paced). 

Dates:

August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze financial transactions and determine whether they are working with asset, liability or equity accounts; record transactions in proper accounting format; prepare balance sheets, income statements, and the statement of cash flows; evaluate inventory costing systems; and apply basic accounting internal control principles over cash.

Instruction:

This is an introduction to the field of accounting and focuses on how financial information is developed and utilized to prepare and interpret financial statements, the fundamentals of the accounting cycle (recording, summarizing, and reporting), and the preparation of financial reports, inventory and internal control.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Accounting, Business, Business Administration, or Finance (8/18).

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