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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Business Courses - Theological Research Institute

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

June 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to understand an ethical decision-making framework; understand and evaluate various organizational influences affecting ethical decisions; present and analyze ethical and moral issues; explore ethical theories; identify and evaluate business ethics theory and corporate social responsibility; identify, interpret, and analyze the global, political, social, environmental, technological and cultural context of the business environment; and articulate issues in business ethics, the ethical business environment and their potential effect on personal, managerial and corporate decisions.

Instruction:

Business ethics is an important part of any industry. Students or managers, unfamiliar with many ethical challenges, behaviors, or regulations will find themselves struggling in business industries that include finance, accounting or human resource management, marketing, and retail. This business ethics course offers an introduction of the concepts of values and morality, as well as cultural beliefs and upbringing in all areas of business, from consumer rights to corporate social responsibility. Decisions made by shift managers or corporate presidents may affect thousands of individuals or entire communities. Consumers today expect and demand integrity, honesty, and transparency in all levels of their environment. Understanding those expectations is the key to communicating core values and behavior not only to employees, but society in general, and these concepts are all explored in the course.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Ethics, Management, Marketing, Operations Management, or Human Resource Management (1/22).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

June 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to understand an ethical decision-making framework; understand and evaluate various organizational influences affecting ethical decisions; present and analyze ethical and moral issues; explore ethical theories; identify and evaluate business ethics theory, and corporate social responsibility; identify, interpret, and analyze the global, political, social, environmental, technological, and cultural context of the business environment; and articulate issues in business ethics, the ethical business environment and their potential effect on personal, managerial and corporate decisions.

Instruction:

Business ethics is an important part of any industry. Students or managers, unfamiliar with many ethical challenges, behaviors, or regulations will find themselves struggling in business industries that include finance, accounting, or human resource management, marketing, and retail. This business ethics course offers an introduction of the concepts of values and morality, as well as cultural beliefs and upbringing in all areas of business, from consumer rights to corporate social responsibility. Decisions made by shift managers or corporate presidents may affect thousands of individuals or entire communities. Consumers today expect and demand integrity, honesty, and transparency in all levels of their environment. Understanding those expectations is the key to communicating core values and behavior not only to employees, but society in general, and these concepts are all explored in the course.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Ethics, Management, Marketing, Operations Management, or Human Resource Management (1/22).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

August 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to distinguish the concept of leadership from the concept of management; compare and contrast the major theories of leadership; analyze the decision-making process and change management; assess the skills necessary to exert power and influence in a non-authoritative leadership role; and evaluate the qualities necessary to effectively manage or lead in a team/group environment.

Instruction:

This course teaches student about effective business leadership techniques, with topics including leadership theory, change management, decision making, and the distinction between leadership and management.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Management, Education, or Healthcare Management (7/22).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

October 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: analyze the meaning and influences guiding the decisions and behaviors of culturally-driven phenomenon; question the power of individual influences on decision making and consumption; relate internal dynamics such as personality and motivation to the choice’s consumers make; relate group dynamics and the relative influence of various group members to the choices made by groups of people; evaluate the influence of culture and subculture on consumer consumption preferences; appraise the applicability of consumer behavior theories to interpreting why consumers behave as they do; assess the components and stages of the individual decision-making process; assess the components and stage of the group decision-making process; demonstrate a high proficiency of critical thinking through interpretation, evaluation, and presentation of marketing concepts (orally and in writing), current events or other data sets.

Instruction:

This course is an introduction to the world of consumer behavior. The discipline borrows from several social sciences including psychology, sociology, and anthropology to explain behavior in the marketplace. In this course, the student will explore how perceptions, learning, memory, personality, and attitudes influence consumption behavior, how consumption changes during one’s life cycle, and how powerful cultural and subcultural influences are on consumers.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management, Marketing, or Psychology (10/20).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

August 2021 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to explain the foundational principles and objectives of accounting; analyze business transactions and record them using Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP); define assets, liabilities, and equity, and apply the specific rules governing their treatment in accounting; perform the steps of the accounting cycle; create the four major financial statements: income statement, balance sheet, statement of stockholders' equity, and cash flow statement; and apply ratio and trend analysis to financial statements to aid in decision-making.

Instruction:

This course introduces students to financial accounting in preparation for more advanced business topics. Recording financial information in a standard format allows managers, investors, lenders, stakeholders, and regulators to make appropriate decisions. This course looks at the income statement, balance sheet, statement of cash flows, and statement of shareholders' equity. Students also learn how to compile and analyze these financial statements from the accounting data they have created.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Mathematics, Business, Finance, Economics, Accounting, Management, Forensic Accounting, or Business Analytics (7/22).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

October 2018 - Present.   

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: provide an understanding of the scope and function of international marketing theory and practice; develop international market entry strategies; analyze international marketing data, in particular the use of secondary data in assessing the international marketing opportunities; identify and analyze opportunities within international marketing environments; utilize cases, readings and international business reports to evaluate corporate marketing; and identify problems and opportunities in an international environment.

Instruction:

This course examines the opportunities and challenges associated with marketing across borders. The impact on marketing of the cultural, economic, political, and technological environments in different countries will be assessed. The relationship between global marketing and global business strategy will be discussed. Ways of analyzing customers and competitors globally will be addressed. Strategies and tactics for developing each of the four "P's" internationally and globally will be examined, including developing 1) product, service, and branding policies, 2) advertising, promotion, and communications plans, 3) channels of distributions, and 4) pricing policies in the global context.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Marketing, International Business, or Management (10/20).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

August 2021 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to understand HR management and systems at various levels in general and in certain specific industries or organizations; focus on and analyze the issues and strategies required to select and develop manpower resources; develop relevant skills necessary for application in HR-related issues; and integrate the understanding of various HR concepts along with the domain concept in order to make correct business decisions.

Instruction:

The main objective of this course is to help students acquire and develop skills to make rational decisions in the discipline of human resource management. An efficient HR manager must guide the workforce, influence their behavior, and motivate them to achieve organizational goals. This course focuses on issues and strategies required to select and develop manpower resources.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Management, Marketing, or Accounting (7/22).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

August 2021 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to successfully assess and advise on business operations and relationships in complex international business environments; successfully apply the principal theories of international trade and investment (exchange rate regimes, global stock; and bond markets); effectively integrate in international business endeavors in critical intracompany departments, such as marketing, manufacturing, accounting, finance, and human resources; effectively position supply, production, and sales functions; speak knowledgeably on the important role played by multinational economic and social aid organizations such as the UN, EU, IMF, and World Bank in facilitating international trade and business; and act ethically, diplomatically, and with emotional sensitivity in international business environments.

Instruction:

Topics covered in this course include the effects on international business decisions of cultural, political, legal, and economic forces; a presentation of international business basics such as trade, tariffs, exchange rate regimes, and capital markets; and a study of the comparative theoretical frameworks for establishing international business enterprises, including trade and investment theory.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Marketing, Economics, or Operations Management (7/22).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

August 2021 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to understand the main features of traditional and modern statistics; analyze statistical data properly; understand the role of formal statistical theory and informal data analytic methods; understand statistical methods relevant to upper division interdisciplinary courses; acquire sharpened statistical intuition and abstract reasoning, as well as reasoning from numerical data through community-based and other research.

Instruction:

This course introduces statistics and is intended for students in a wide variety of areas of study. Topics discussed include displaying and describing data, the normal curve, regression, probability, statistical inference, confidence intervals, and hypothesis tests with applications in the real world. Students also have an opportunity to analyze data sets using technology.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Mathematics, Economics, Business, Finance, Accounting, or Management (7/22).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

June 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

In this course, students will be able to define concepts related to national income; compare calculation methods of national income; relate factors to determine national income such as consumption, saving, and investment; interpret macroeconomic issues such as money, foreign exchange, inflation, unemployment, economic growth, and foreign trade; express the definition of money and the functions and types of money; explain the definition, causes, and effects of inflation; categorize unemployment by types; explain the types of and the process of the exchange rate; express economic growth and development concepts; and explain export, import, and foreign trade deficit concepts.

Instruction:

The course will cover the determination of income, employment, the price level, interest rates, and exchange rates in the economy. The economy will be analyzed in the short run (e.g., business cycle and stabilization policy) and in the long run (e.g., economic growth). The insights of Keynesian and classical theories will be integrated into the course. During the course, a variety of simple models will be presented. As macroeconomics is an empirical discipline, the course will cover case studies and statistical data interpretation. Special attention will be given to current European developments.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business Administration, Economics, Marketing, Finance, Healthcare Administration, or as a general elective (5/21).

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