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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Business Courses - Theological Research Institute

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

June 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to understand an ethical decision-making framework; understand and evaluate various organizational influences affecting ethical decisions; present and analyze ethical and moral issues; explore ethical theories; identify and evaluate business ethics theory and corporate social responsibility; identify, interpret, and analyze the global, political, social, environmental, technological and cultural context of the business environment; and articulate issues in business ethics, the ethical business environment and their potential effect on personal, managerial and corporate decisions.

Instruction:

Business ethics is an important part of any industry. Students or managers, unfamiliar with many ethical challenges, behaviors, or regulations will find themselves struggling in business industries that include finance, accounting or human resource management, marketing, and retail. This business ethics course offers an introduction of the concepts of values and morality, as well as cultural beliefs and upbringing in all areas of business, from consumer rights to corporate social responsibility. Decisions made by shift managers or corporate presidents may affect thousands of individuals or entire communities. Consumers today expect and demand integrity, honesty, and transparency in all levels of their environment. Understanding those expectations is the key to communicating core values and behavior not only to employees, but society in general, and these concepts are all explored in the course.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Ethics, Management, Marketing, Operations Management, or Human Resource Management (1/22).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

June 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to understand an ethical decision-making framework; understand and evaluate various organizational influences affecting ethical decisions; present and analyze ethical and moral issues; explore ethical theories; identify and evaluate business ethics theory, and corporate social responsibility; identify, interpret, and analyze the global, political, social, environmental, technological, and cultural context of the business environment; and articulate issues in business ethics, the ethical business environment and their potential effect on personal, managerial and corporate decisions.

Instruction:

Business ethics is an important part of any industry. Students or managers, unfamiliar with many ethical challenges, behaviors, or regulations will find themselves struggling in business industries that include finance, accounting, or human resource management, marketing, and retail. This business ethics course offers an introduction of the concepts of values and morality, as well as cultural beliefs and upbringing in all areas of business, from consumer rights to corporate social responsibility. Decisions made by shift managers or corporate presidents may affect thousands of individuals or entire communities. Consumers today expect and demand integrity, honesty, and transparency in all levels of their environment. Understanding those expectations is the key to communicating core values and behavior not only to employees, but society in general, and these concepts are all explored in the course.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Ethics, Management, Marketing, Operations Management, or Human Resource Management (1/22).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

October 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: analyze the meaning and influences guiding the decisions and behaviors of culturally-driven phenomenon; question the power of individual influences on decision making and consumption; relate internal dynamics such as personality and motivation to the choice’s consumers make; relate group dynamics and the relative influence of various group members to the choices made by groups of people; evaluate the influence of culture and subculture on consumer consumption preferences; appraise the applicability of consumer behavior theories to interpreting why consumers behave as they do; assess the components and stages of the individual decision-making process; assess the components and stage of the group decision-making process; demonstrate a high proficiency of critical thinking through interpretation, evaluation, and presentation of marketing concepts (orally and in writing), current events or other data sets.

Instruction:

This course is an introduction to the world of consumer behavior. The discipline borrows from several social sciences including psychology, sociology, and anthropology to explain behavior in the marketplace. In this course, the student will explore how perceptions, learning, memory, personality, and attitudes influence consumption behavior, how consumption changes during one’s life cycle, and how powerful cultural and subcultural influences are on consumers.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management, Marketing, or Psychology (10/20).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

October 2018 - Present.   

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: provide an understanding of the scope and function of international marketing theory and practice; develop international market entry strategies; analyze international marketing data, in particular the use of secondary data in assessing the international marketing opportunities; identify and analyze opportunities within international marketing environments; utilize cases, readings and international business reports to evaluate corporate marketing; and identify problems and opportunities in an international environment.

Instruction:

This course examines the opportunities and challenges associated with marketing across borders. The impact on marketing of the cultural, economic, political, and technological environments in different countries will be assessed. The relationship between global marketing and global business strategy will be discussed. Ways of analyzing customers and competitors globally will be addressed. Strategies and tactics for developing each of the four "P's" internationally and globally will be examined, including developing 1) product, service, and branding policies, 2) advertising, promotion, and communications plans, 3) channels of distributions, and 4) pricing policies in the global context.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Marketing, International Business, or Management (10/20).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

June 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

In this course, students will be able to define concepts related to national income; compare calculation methods of national income; relate factors to determine national income such as consumption, saving, and investment; interpret macroeconomic issues such as money, foreign exchange, inflation, unemployment, economic growth, and foreign trade; express the definition of money and the functions and types of money; explain the definition, causes, and effects of inflation; categorize unemployment by types; explain the types of and the process of the exchange rate; express economic growth and development concepts; and explain export, import, and foreign trade deficit concepts.

Instruction:

The course will cover the determination of income, employment, the price level, interest rates, and exchange rates in the economy. The economy will be analyzed in the short run (e.g., business cycle and stabilization policy) and in the long run (e.g., economic growth). The insights of Keynesian and classical theories will be integrated into the course. During the course, a variety of simple models will be presented. As macroeconomics is an empirical discipline, the course will cover case studies and statistical data interpretation. Special attention will be given to current European developments.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business Administration, Economics, Marketing, Finance, Healthcare Administration, or as a general elective (5/21).

Length:

Self study, self-paced.

Dates:

October 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: apply economic reasoning to business decisions, understand the fundamentals of individual and firm behavior, estimate simple equations using regression and apply them in an economic context, use optimization to determine equilibria under a variety of market structures, apply game theory to economic decision making, understand advanced pricing strategies under market power, describe economic underpinnings of managerial decisions, and apply economics concepts to an individual problem.

Instruction:

Managerial Economics utilizes microeconomic theory and econometric techniques to analyze business decision making. Major topics include demand analysis and estimation, forecasting, cost analysis and estimation, market structures, pricing strategies, and game theory. The course combines mathematical skills with applications and examples from economics and business. A basic understanding of differential calculus is essential. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Accounting, Business, Economics, Finance, Management, Organizational Behavior, Human Resource Management or as a general elective (10/20).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

June 2021- Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be expected to fully grasp the subjects at hand and learn how to implement their studies into everyday personal and professional living; explain the role of scarcity, specialization, opportunity cost, and cost/benefit analysis in economic decision-making; identify the determinants of supply and demand; demonstrate the impact of shifts in both market supply and demand curves on equilibrium price and output; summarize the law of diminishing marginal utility; describe the process of utility maximization; calculate supply and demand elasticities; identify the determinants of price elasticity of demand and supply, and demonstrate the relationship between elasticity and total revenue; describe the production function and the Law of Diminishing Marginal Productivity; calculate and graph short-run and long-run costs of production; identify the four market structures by characteristics; calculate and graph the profit maximizing price and quantity in the output markets by use of marginal analysis; and determine the profit maximizing price and quantity of resources in factor markets under perfect and imperfect competition by the use of marginal analysis.

Instruction:

Microeconomics I is the first subject of the training cycle in Economic Theory. Its importance and complexity arise from the fact it is the first time the student becomes familiar with current economic models. During the course, the student will learn to formalize economic phenomena and gain an understanding of their workings. The course covers the basic economic models of consumer theory, production theory, and partial equilibrium.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business Administration, Marketing, Finance, Healthcare Administration, or as a general elective (5/21).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

October 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this learning experience, students will be able to: analyze the concepts of analyzing multivariate data; outline matrix competency with general aspects of handling multivariate data; identify a range of multivariate techniques available; establish a link between multivariate techniques and corresponding univariate techniques; use multivariate techniques appropriately; and undertake multivariate hypothesis tests and draw appropriate conclusions.

Instruction:

Multivariate Statistical techniques are important tools of analysis in all fields of management: Finance, Production, Accounting, Marketing, and Personnel Management. In addition, they play key roles in the fundamental disciplines of the social science: Economics, Psychology, Sociology, etc. This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of the basic concepts underlying the most important multivariate techniques with an overview of actual applications in various fields, and with experience in actually using such techniques on a problem of their own choosing. The course will address underlying mathematics and problems of applications. Prerequisite knowledge and competence in statistics and mathematics is needed.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Accounting, Business, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Data Science, Economics, Finance, Statistics, or Marketing (10/20 revalidation).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

June 2021 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to understand and apply the concept of public speaking and its idea of being audience-centered; display understanding of the most efficient way to prepare a speech; understand speech ethics and listening skills and their importance; practice the importance of understanding your audience and before whom you are speaking; write a speech, including choosing and researching a topic, providing sufficient supports, and organizing the speech; and present the speech in a coherent, open-minded, and inclusive manner.

Instruction:

This public speaking course helps the student become a more confident public speaker and write more coherent and dynamic speeches. In this course, the student receives in-depth information on developing an engaging program and delivering a presentation with power. The student learns how to create a basic outline of a speech, organize a program in a way that makes the most sense, and deliver it in a way that is most engaging. The student also learns techniques to overcome nervousness, and many other issues faced by speakers.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Public Speaking (1/22).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

October 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this learning experience, students will be able to: identify the actors who have shaped the globalization in different historical periods; analyze multiple globalization ideologies; analyze variations in the global patterns and evaluate the various impacts on development; identify and evaluate some of the alternative ways of approaching development being pursued today; identify and describe the rationale for and critiques of development policies and programs that have been pursued, and evaluate their various impacts.

Instruction:

The aim of the course is to contribute to a critical understanding of the relationships among globalization, migration, and the welfare state. Each of these phenomena is complex and important in their own right. This course, however, will explore the significant ways in which these forces interact and affect each other. In addition to a general introduction to the major themes and their intersections, students will focus on  approaches to immigration and immigrant integration as well as variation in the experiences of immigrants in relation to social policies and economic conditions.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Economics, International Business, Management, Marketing, or Organizational Behavior (10/20).

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