Skip to main content

National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Search Google Appliance

Apprentice Program for Millwrights: Four Year Program

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1: 35 hours (1 week). Version 2: 40 hours (1 week). 

Dates:

Version 1: February 2004 -  December 2018. Version 2: January 2019 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe a rigger's responsibility for safety on the jobsite; describe the limits of safe equipment operation; describe the basic construction and standard designs of wire rope; calculate working load limit (WLL) for various cables; identify and discuss safe practices when rigging with wire, rope, chains, and slings; identify the construction and purpose of hardware equipment; inspect rigging equipment using industry standard criteria; identify standard types of cranes used in rigging operations and assist in safe crane setup; and identify load conditions that result in a critical lift using a capacity chart; direct crane movement for rigging operations using appropriate hand or voice signals.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course addresses rigging safety, rigging hardware construction, rigging hardware inspection, knots, and rigging procedures. Apprentices work with different types of cranes and direct crane movements through voice and hand signals.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Millwright, Carpentry, or Construction Technology (11/08) (11/13 revalidation) (1/19 revalidation).

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:

Course 1: 10 hours (1 week). Course 2: 8 hours (1 week).

Dates:

Course 1 and 2: September 2003 - Present.

Objectives:
Course 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify lift components; perform a safety inspection; safely operate self-propelled aerial lift; safely operate a boom-supported aerial lift; discuss OSHA and ANSI standards for aerial lifts. Course 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: use safe procedures for operating both electric motor and internal combustion engine lift trucks; discuss how to calculate load weights so as not to overload a lift truck; qualify for UBC qualification in lift-truck operations.
Instruction:
Course 1: This course addresses safety regulations and safe operation practices related to Self-Propelled Elevated Work Platforms and Boom-Supported Elevated Work Platforms. The training is delivered with classroom instruction and a series of hands-on exercises designed to evaluate the proficiency of the student. Successful completion of this course provides apprentices with an aerial lift operator qualification card. Course 2: The powered industrial lift truck (sometimes called forklift) is essential for millwrights to transport the heavy equipment and machinery common to the trade, including large bolts, turbine and conveyor components. This course combines OSHA-approved instruction in the safe and proper use of the lift truck with hands-on operation. The course concludes with an official road test; successful completers will receive a UBC qualification in lift truck operations.
Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Millwright, Carpentry, or Construction Technology (11/08) (11/13 revalidation) (1/19 revalidation). NOTE: Both courses must be completed to receive credit. 

Location:
Work sites approved by The New York City District Council of Carpenters.
Length:
Minimum 1,300 hours per year over 4 years.
Dates:
September 2003 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the 4-year apprenticeship program, students will be able to apply the knowledge and skills developed during the course of the apprenticeship program in the field.

Instruction:

This apprenticeship is designed to expose students to a work setting under the mentorship of skilled millwrights. Students work on various projects honing and reinforcing the skills and knowledge presented in the overall curriculum.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Millwright or Construction Technology (11/08) (11/13 revalidation) (1/19 revalidation). NOTE: Credit  recommendations are only valid for students who began the apprenticeship program in the fall of 2003 or later and have successfully completed ALL courses. 

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:
Course 1: 48 hours (12 weeks). Course 2: 8 hours (1 week).
Dates:

Course 1 and 2: September 2002 - Present.

Objectives:

Course 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss welding hazards and the safety measures required to guard against them on a construction site; discuss the electrode classification system; explain and properly use the electrode holders, guns, and torches appropriate to the different kinds of welding and cutting; recognize required and optional welding symbols and their instructions; describe welding techniques used with shielded metal arc welding (SMAW); interpret bead examples. Course 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: safely operate an oxyacetylene cutting torch to properly cut through iron and steel; earn FDNY Certificate of Fitness for Torch Use of Flammable Gasses; and earn FDNY Certificate of Fitness for Fire Guard for Field Construction and Torch Operations.

Instruction:

Course 1: This course provides current welding information and techniques to prepare students for employment in the welding field as well as individuals who wish to upgrade their welding skills. Apprentices learn to operate basic equipment used in shielded metal arc welding and oxy-acetylene cutting, and are instructed in the choice of proper electrodes. Topics include: terminology, critical temperatures, welding distortion and defects, blueprint reading for welders and joint design. The course combines lecture and lab and prepares students for industry certification exams. Course 2: This course is designed to prepare apprentices to pass the FDNY Examination for Certificate of Fitness for Torch Use of Flammable Gasses and the FDNY Examination for the Certificate of Fitness for Fire Guard for Field Construction Site and Torch Operations. Students learn to safely operate an oxyacetylene cutting torch to properly cut through iron and steel. Apprentices also learn the roles and duties of a fire guard on a construction site, including the prevention of and proper response to fires. Millwright apprentices must be qualified to operate an oxyacetylene torch and to function as a fire guard as they may be required to do so on a job site.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as a technical elective in Millwright, Carpentry or Construction Technology (11/08) (11/13 revalidation) (1/19 revalidation). NOTE: Both courses must be completed to receive credit.

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:

35 hours (1 week); additionally, continuous reinforcement throughout the four-year curriculum.

Dates:
September 2008 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: read and interpret notation and symbols used in blueprints; read drawing dimensions and articulate in common language what the blueprint indicates the millwright should do; correctly interpret two sets of blueprints; identify possible errors in the blueprint; and perform a project layout based on a blueprint.

Instruction:

Millwrights are required to read blueprints in order to determine proper machinery layout at a given field site, as well as to assemble and repair machinery itself. Apprentices completing this course will be able to read and interpret blueprint specifications issued by an engineer or the machine manufacturer. Skill level is evaluated by the instructor through observation of student ability to interpret blueprints for machine assembly common to the millwright trade as well as a final examination.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as a technical elective in Millwright or Construction Technology (11/08) (11/13 revalidation) (1/19 revalidation). NOTE: The entire four-year Millwright Apprentice Program must be successfully completed in order to receive credit for this course.

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:
35 hours (1 week).
Dates:
March 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the components, terminology and operations associated with the GE Combustion Turbine; discuss the type and methods of inspection used; discuss the basics of GE turbine installation; work with a generator rotor; discuss how precision optical levels are used in turbine installation and repair; perform the two-peg test; and read blueprints at a basic level

Instruction:

This course covers turbine components, inspection procedures, factors affecting turbine life, troubleshooting standard procedures and turbine installation using precision optical instruments. Topics include: principles of operation; component identification and function; simple and combined cycle methods; auxiliary systems and maintenance path procedures. Students practice optical instruments usage and perfect the two-peg test in preparation for the hands-on training at the Carpenters International Training Center in Las Vegas.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Millwright or Construction Technology (11/08) (11/13 revalidation) (1/19 revalidation).

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:

Course 1: 11 hours (1 week). Course 2 and 3: 35 hours (1 week).

Dates:

Course 1, 2, and 3: March 2005 - Present.

Objectives:

Course 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the key functions of a millwright in the field, as well as the history of construction millwrighting; properly identify and handle basic hand and precision tools used in the millwright trade; pass written and practical tests on tool use and identification. Course 2: Students will be able to: use safe practices in handling and using hand and drill presses and grinders; properly identify and handle precision tools required in the millwright trade, including micrometers, dial indicators, feeler gauges and calipers; discuss and perform basic project layout; use precision tools to level plates, and measure depth; properly align a machine-based centerline using the tightwire method. Course 3: Students will be able to: identify and properly handle specialty wrenches commonly used in the millwright trade; sharpen tools and drill bits using machinery found in the field; discuss basic bolting theory and its applications to practical use; discuss the use of and safely operate a milling machine, lathe and surface grinder to fabricate parts and precision grind surfaces; assemble precision optical instruments and check calibration; establish a vertical reference plane from which measurements can be taken; establish an optical reference plane perpendicular to a pre-established line of sight; level and adjust the elevation of a machine base; align a machine-based centerline and vertical machinery components; conduct a two-peg test.

Instruction:

Course 1: The overall goal of this course is to provide an academic introduction to the occupational skills that millwrights in the New York City area must master in order to effectively install, replace, dismantle, and repair machinery and heavy equipment used in turbines, conveyor systems and other large-scale machinery requiring precision measurements and alignment. Apprentices receive an introduction to the Millwright trade and learn to identify and use basic hand and precision tools, including inside, outside and depth micrometers. Course 2: This course provides an introduction to the precision tools, machinery and layout methods used in the millwright trade. Apprentices are introduced to the most basic form of layout in preparation for more complex layout projects. Instruction combines lecture about machine safety and precision tools with hands-on projects designed to build apprentice skill in the use of micrometers, precision levels, dial indicators and the Brunson optical level. Projects include machine-base leveling, dial indicator and micrometer use, and tight wire readings and adjustments. Successful completion enables millwrights to use precision measuring instruments to take accurate readings on the jobsite. Course 3: This course provides both theoretical and practical instruction in bolting techniques, the operation of machine tools commonly used in the millwright trade and instruction in the use of optical instruments to conduct layout. Students completing this course receive the UBC-recognized Hytorc ™ Bolting Technician Qualification and is qualified to safely use hydraulic torque wrenches and machine tools in accordance with industry practices and standards. Apprentices assemble and use the Brunson optical level and theodolite to set machinery centerlines to conduct the two-peg test and earn a theodolite qualification card.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Millwright or Construction Technology (11/08) (11/13 revalidation) (1/19 revalidation).  NOTE: All three courses must be completed to receive credit.

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:
35 hours (1 week).
Dates:
September 2002 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and define physical and health hazards and toxicity of chemicals; recognize an emergency and take appropriate steps to prevent further injury; perform basic first aid and secure the injured person(s) until emergency personnel arrive; identify and demonstrate how to practice standard precautions to reduce the risk of disease transmission; and apply simple ergonomic principles and procedures to reduce the risk of injury to the muscles.

Instruction:
This course creates awareness of the most prevalent hazards associated with the construction site and provides apprentices with the knowledge and skills necessary to help minimize the consequences of injury. The course covers the federal regulatory requirements that govern work site safety and conditions (OSHA) and the following topics: First Aid and CPR, blood borne pathogens, and general ergonomics (effective ways to work to prevent injury and Cumulative Trauma Disorders). All training is conducted by OSHA-certified instructors.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Millwright, Carpentry, Electrician, Welding, Tool and Die, Welding Repair, Pipefitting and Plumbing, Construction Technology, and related disciplines (11/08) (11/13 revalidation) (1/19 revalidation).

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1 and  2: 35 hours (1 week).

Dates:
Version 1: March 2007 - October 2013. Version 2: November 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 or 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the functions of conveyor systems in bulk mailing operations; use precision measurement and perform tool use tasks required for building and installing conveyor systems; and use precision optical instruments to correctly set machinery elevation.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course introduces apprentices to the installation and maintenance of conveyor systems. Millwrights install and repair conveyors used in bulk mailing operations, such as the U.S. Postal Service, Fed Ex and UPS. Millwrights also work with conveyors in other settings, such as airports, sewage treatment plants and retail distribution centers. Apprentices completing this course learn the basics of conveyor terminology, installing and repairing both belt and monorail conveyors and associated precision measurement and leveling tasks.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Millwright or Construction Technology (11/08). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Millwright or Construction Technology (11/13 revalidation) (1/19 revalidation). 

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 35 hours (1 week).

Dates:
Version 1: March 2004 - October 2013. Version 2: November 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss why proper coupling alignment of stationary and rotating components is critical to machine function; discuss circumstances under which alignment checks should be performed, other than initial machinery installation; measure and correct angularity to square the coupling face; perform all phases of machinery alignment using three measurement methods: feeler gauge and straightedge alignment, dial indicator alignment, and laser alignment.

Instruction:
Version 1 or 2: Precision alignment is critical to the successful installation and operation of the large-scale machinery on which millwrights work. During the course, students learn to perform a coupling alignment of a motor and a pump to within 1/1000th of an inch, using multiple methods, including laser alignment. Students learn to troubleshoot common alignment problems associated with Babbitt and roller bearings.
Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour as a laboratory in Millwright or Construction Technology (11/08). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours as a laboratory in Millwright or Construction Technology (11/13 revalidation) (1/19 revalidation).

Top