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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Newark School of Theology | Evaluated Learning Experience

Theological Ethics

Location: 
Newark School of Theology,Two Park Place, Newark, New Jersey.
Length: 

Version 1 and 2: 45 hours (15 weeks).

Dates: 

Version 1: January 2001 - March 2007. Version 2: April 2007 - December 2016. 

Instructional delivery format: 
Traditional classroom model
Learner Outcomes: 

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand and report on books and articles written by philosophic ethicists; know and discuss some of the major teachings of St. Thomas Aquinas concerning ethical principles, moral responsibility, the Law of the Gospel, and the grace of God; know and demonstrate how to apply general interpretative principles to Biblical texts when appealing to scripture in moral debate; demonstrate how to use the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a resource for ethical analysis; understand and describe the Ten Commandments in their original setting and how these apply to human rights in the contemporary world; understand and explain the connections between the Christian faith and the ethical commitment that empowers Christian ethics through study of the sermons of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in Strength to Love. Version 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand and report on books and articles written by philosophic ethicists; know and discuss some of the major teachings of St. Thomas Aquinas concerning ethical principles, moral responsibility, the Law of the Gospel, and the grace of God; know and demonstrate how to apply general interpretative principles to Biblical texts when appealing to scripture in moral debate; demonstrate how to use the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a resource for ethical analysis; understand and describe the Ten Commandments in their original setting and how these apply to human rights in the contemporary world; understand and explain the connections between the Christian faith and the ethical commitment that empowers Christian ethics through study of the sermons of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in Strength to Love.

Instruction: 

Version 1: Major topics are: sources of theological ethics; The Universal Declaration of Human Rights; introduction to philosophic ethics (Frankena); introduction to classical Christian Ethics (Aquinas); hermeneutical rules for appealing to scripture in moral debate (Cosgrove); The Ten Commandments and Human Rights (Harrelson); sermons by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on the Christian faith and ethical commitment. Methods of instruction include: assignments prior to class which students are responsible for presenting to the whole class for exposition and then a general discussion of the analysis of the text, as well as its relationship to lived experience. The faculty member guides the discussion, as necessary, as well as evaluates student's progress. There are several short written assignments as well as a final examination. NOTE: For the graduate level recommendation, the student must already possess a baccalaureate degree and submit a 15-20 page graduate level paper at the completion of the course. Version 2: Major topics are: sources of theological ethics; The Universal Declaration of Human Rights; introduction to philosophic ethics (Frankena); introduction to classical Christian Ethics (Aquinas); hermeneutical rules for appealing to scripture in moral debate (Cosgrove); The Ten Commandments and Human Rights (Harrelson); sermons by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on the Christian faith and ethical commitment. Methods of instruction include: assignments prior to class which students are responsible for presenting to the whole class for exposition and then a general discussion of the analysis of the text, as well as its relationship to lived experience. The faculty member guides the discussion, as necessary, as well as evaluates student's progress. There are several short written assignments as well as a final examination. NOTE: For the graduate level recommendation, the student must already possess a baccalaureate degree and submit a 15-20 page graduate level paper at the completion of the course.

Credit recommendation: 

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Theological Ethics or Religion (10/10). Version 2: In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Theological Ethics or Religion (10/10).

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