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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Newark School of Theology | Evaluated Learning Experience

Ancient Israel (Old Testament): Part II

Location: 
Newark School of Theology,Two Park Place, Newark, New Jersey.
Length: 

Version 1 and 2: 45 hours (15 weeks).

Dates: 

Version 1: January 1999 - March 2007. Version 2: April 2007 - December 2016.

Instructional delivery format: 
Traditional classroom model
Learner Outcomes: 

Version 1: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: understand and explain the development of kingship in ancient Israel; understand and explain how monarchical institutions reshaped Israel's earlier inter-tribal institutions, social experience, and understanding of God; know and explain the histories (in so far as contemporary scholarship can reconstruct them) of the Northern Kingdom (Israel) and the Southern Kingdom (Judah); understand and explain the rise of the Hebrew prophets within their political and social contexts and the social meaning of their creative theologies; know and explain the main issues and themes found in both the major and minor prophets of Israel and Judah; understand and explain how the Hebrew Bible was submit during Colonial rule of the Jewish people, the restoration under Ezra and Nehemiah; and have a knowledge of the third part of the Hebrew Bible (The Writings). Version 2: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: understand and explain the development of kingship in ancient Israel; understand and explain how monarchical institutions reshaped Israel's earlier inter-tribal institutions, social experience, and understanding of God; know and explain the histories (in so far as contemporary scholarship can reconstruct them) of the Northern Kingdom (Israel) and the Southern Kingdom (Judah); understand and explain the rise of the Hebrew prophets within their political and social contexts and the social meaning of their creative theologies; know and explain the main issues and themes found in both the major and minor prophets of Israel and Judah; understand and explain how the Hebrew Bible was submit during Colonial rule of the Jewish people, the restoration under Ezra and Nehemiah; and have a knowledge of the third part of the Hebrew Bible (The Writings).

Instruction: 

Version 1: Major topics are: literary culture, religious cult, and ideology of the early monarchy; primary sources for the reconstruction of the history of the Northern Kingdom; its literary culture and religion; historical traditions and the prophetic literature of the Southern Kingdom; prophetic writings associated with Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel; the restoration under the leadership of Ezra and Nehemiah; the twelve 'minor' prophets; Wisdom and apocalyptic literature; synthesis of the social, historical, and literary dimensions of ancient Israel from its emergence in Canaan up to Colonial rule under the Romans. Methods of instruction include: assignments prior to class which students are responsible for presenting to the whole class for exposition and then a general discussion of the analysis of the text, as well as its relationship to lived experience. The faculty member guides the discussion, as necessary, as well as evaluates student's progress. There are also numerous short written assignments as well as a final examination. NOTE: For the graduate level recommendation, the student must already possess a baccalaureate degree and submit a 15-20 page graduate level paper at the completion of the course. Version 2: Major topics course are: literary culture, religious cult, and ideology of the early monarchy; primary sources for the reconstruction of the history of the Northern Kingdom; its literary culture and religion; historical traditions and the prophetic literature of the Southern Kingdom; prophetic writings associated with Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel; the restoration under the leadership of Ezra and Nehemiah; the twelve 'minor' prophets; Wisdom and apocalyptic literature; synthesis of the social, historical, and literary dimensions of ancient Israel from its emergence in Canaan up to Colonial rule under the Romans. Methods of instruction include: assignments prior to class which students are responsible for presenting to the whole class for exposition and then a general discussion of the analysis of the text, as well as its relationship to lived experience. The faculty member guides the discussion, as necessary, as well as evaluates student's progress. There are also numerous short written assignments as well as a final examination. NOTE: For the graduate level recommendation, the student must already possess a baccalaureate degree and submit a 15-20 page graduate level paper at the completion of the course.

Credit recommendation: 

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Ancient Israel II, Biblical Studies, or Religion (10/10).  Version 2: In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Ancient Israel ll, Biblical Studies, or Religion (10/10).

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