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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

One-year Filmmaking Program - Semester 2

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Length:
Dates:

October 2011 - December 2019. 

Objectives:

See learner outcomes for individual course listings.Course list includes: Cinema Studies I and II, Directing Actors I and II, Documentary Filmmaking, Producing I, Production Design I and II, and Sound II. 

Instruction:

See instruction for individual course listings.Course list includes: Cinema Studies I and II, Directing Actors I and II, Documentary Filmmaking, Producing I, Production Design I and II, and Sound II. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours (10/16). NOTE: Credit is recommended only after students complete all 9 Special Topics courses within the given semester. Course list includes: Cinema Studies I and II, Directing Actors I and II, Documentary Filmmaking, Producing I, Production Design I and II, and Sound II. 

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY
Length:

Course 1: Version 1: 87.5 hours (116 weeks). Course 2: Version 1: 312.5 hours (16 weeks).

Course 1: Version 2: 50 hours (16 weeks). Course 2: Version 2: 75 hours (16 weeks). 

Dates:

Course 1 and 2: Version 1: September 2007 - September 2016. Course 1 and 2Version 2: October 2016 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Course 1: Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: create and implement a director's palette and utilize visual building blocks using space, line, shape, tone, color, rhythm, and movement to communicate mood, emotion, ideas, and the creation of a visual structure to a film; generate directing notes; utilize lenses and compositions, identify different approaches to directing a scene (long take, master shot discipline, multi-angularity, montage, parallel action), and identify ways to deal with directorial pressure on a film shoot; experience the Director's interrelationship with the crew for a sound or a high definition video film project. Course 2: Version 1 and 2: Students will be able to: experience the role and myriad responsibilities of the film Director; experience their relationship with all crew positions with special emphasis on Assistant Director, Production Manager, Cinematographer, Assistant Camera, Gaffer, Grip, Sound Recordist, Boom Operator, Production Designer and Production Assistant on their fellow student thesis shoots.

Instruction:

 Course 1: Version 1 and 2: During the course, students classify the crew roles of an Assistant Director, Production Manager, Sound Recordist, Boom Operator, 1st and 2nd Assistant Camera, and Continuity, Gaffer, and Grip. Students break down the crew roles and set procedures for a 7-15 person crew shooting a project on either 16mm sync sound or High Definition video; generate a Thesis Production Book  containing: script, floor plans, shot list, visual materials, Director's notes, and rehearsal notes. Students explore how to direct with lenses and compositions, different approaches to directing a scene (long take, master shot discipline, multi-angularity, montage, parallel action), and prepare for troubleshooting on a film shoot; create a Director's palette and utilize visual building blocks using space, line, shape, tone, color, rhythm, and movement to communicate mood, emotion, ideas, and the creation of a visual structure to a film; screen scenes from feature length films and break down the directorial approaches and style that a director brings to a film. Course 2: Version 1 and 2: This course is a practical application of learning from all the components in the directing, writing, cinematography, sound recording, and editing second level courses as they relate to the making of a thesis film. Students work in a variety of crew positions such as: Assistant Director, Production Manager, Cinematographer, Assistant Camera, Gaffer, Grip, Sound Recordist, Boom Operator, Production Designer and Production Assistant on their fellow student thesis shoots. Students are required to work on a minimum of five other thesis projects as crewmembers. In the process of producing their thesis films, students experience the role and myriad responsibilities of Director and related crew positions. Students gain an awareness of the range of competencies and expertise in these roles via regular assessment and evaluation.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and 2: Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours, distributed as follows: 4 semester hours as Directing in Filmmaking and 2 semester hours as Production in Filmmaking (7/08) (10/16 revalidation). NOTE: Each semester of the One-Year Filmmaking Program is an integrated, cross-disciplinary experience. Credit is recommended only after students complete all courses within a given semester. 

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1: 153.5 hours (16 weeks). Version 2: 71 hours (16 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: September 2007 - September 2016. Version 2: October 2016 - December 2019. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: operate the Arriflex 16SR camera, HD camera, and accessories; load the film magazine, use the battery and charger, and use the tripod; test and prevent problems; discuss how 16mm camera maintains sync; create scene files on HD, shoot HD at 720 and 1080; discuss HD workflow, slating, filling out camera reports, functions of all moving parts on the camera, how to use the eye-piece and zoom lens, marking focus pulls and zooms, labeling the magazine, film can, and HD storage device, focal lengths, filters, and apertures, and how to operate the Spyder dolly; discuss the properties of color negative and color reversal film with regards to grain, latitude, and density; operate C-Stands, Double Risers, Baby Stands, Hi-Boy Stands, Clamps (Maffers, Cardellini, Duck Bill, Large Studded C-Clamp, Spring and Gaffer Grips, Baby Wall Plates), Apple Boxes (full, 1/2, 1/4), Scrims (full double, full single, half double, half single-flag kit (solids, singles, doubles, silks) and use Tweeney, Inky, Baby Juniors, and a 2K Solarspot, and Filtration and Processing Techniques.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course trains students to operate the Arriflex 16SR camera and its accessories and the Panasonic HVX 200 Camera and its accessories. Through hands-on practice, they learn: loading the Film magazine, use of the battery and charger, use of tripod, testing and preventing problems, how 16mm camera maintains sync, creating scene files on HD, shooting HD at 720 and 1080, HD workflow, slating, filling out camera reports, functions of all moving parts on the camera, how to use the eye-piece and zoom lens, marking focus pulls and zooms, labeling the magazine, film can, and HD storage device, focal lengths, filters, and apertures, and the use of the Spyder dolly. This course also immerses students in the technical and creative demands of cinematography. Color film stocks are tested to help students make the best choice for their films. The use of color correcting filters and gels is practiced through shooting tests. Lighting and contrast ratios are reviewed. In addition, students learn the most economical ways to light a scene by shooting set-ups from their own storyboards. A special focus on lighting and for shooting with HD enables students to achieve a film look and maximizes possibilities of working with this format. Students participate in Cinematography labs, working as different crewmembers in each lab. Crew positions are: Director, Director of Photography, Assistant Director, Assistant Camera, Gaffer, Sound Recordist, Boom Operator, and Dolly Grip. The student director for each production workshop selects a scene from their thesis film to shoot. They and the assigned D.P., and A.D., present their production package in the Cinematography Lab prep classes where they submit: a Contact Sheet, Production Schedule, Shot List, Floor Plan, Director's Notes, Character's Bios, Scene Beats, and the Script of the Scene to be reviewed.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours as Cinematography in Filmmaking (7/08). NOTE: Each semester of the One-Year Filmmaking Program is an integrated, cross-disciplinary experience. Credit is recommended only after a student completes all courses within a given semester. Version 2:  In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours as Cinematography in Filmmaking (10/16 revalidation). NOTE: Each semester of the One-Year Filmmaking Program is an integrated, cross-disciplinary experience. Credit is recommended only after students complete all courses within a given semester. 

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1: 103.5 hours (16 weeks). Version 2: 27 hours (16 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: September 2007 - September 2016. Version 2: October 2016 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the principles of exposition in their future scripts (flashbacks, dream sequences, voice-overs, dialogue, and montage), unity and composition (motifs, set-up and pay-off, ascension and progression in storytelling); identify and measure the components and properties of different genres in storytelling and use these principles in analyzing various scripts for short films and in their own future writing.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course prepares students for writing the script for their thesis film starting from story idea to step outline to rough draft to final draft. Half of each class is divided into a workshop session in which students present their written work, while the other half of the class explores advanced screenwriting techniques such as exposition, unity and composition, and introduction to genre expectations in the various genres through lecture and discussion. Students then change sessions for the remainder of the course.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours as Screenwriting in Filmmaking (7/08). NOTE: Each semester of the One-Year Filmmaking Program is an integrated, cross-disciplinary experience. Credit is recommended only after a student completes all courses within a given semester. Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour as Screenwriting in Filmmaking (10/16 revalidation). NOTE: Each semester of the One-Year Filmmaking Program is an integrated, cross-disciplinary experience. Credit is recommended only after a student completes all courses within a given semester. 

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1: 116 hours (16 weeks). Version 2: 120 hours (16 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: September 2007 - September 2016. Version 2: October 2016 - December 2019. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the differences between linear and dialectical editing, how to identify and construct action match cuts, cutting on movement, jump cuts, jump cut editing style, montage, parallel cutting, graphic match cuts, action wipes, separation, overlapping dialogue, cutting POV and reaction shots, disguising bad cuts, and multi-angularity; discuss the elements of advanced sound editing; operate DVD-Studio Pro to export films into the compressor, and build menu options on DVDs.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course is a continuation of FIL140 where students further explore the technical and aesthetic approaches to editing while editing their thesis film on Final Cut Pro. Students participate in three classes on Editing Aesthetics where they explore the difference between linear and dialectical editing, how to identify and construct action match cuts, cutting on movement, jump cuts, jump cut editing style, montage, parallel cutting, graphic match cuts, action wipes, separation, overlapping dialogue, cutting POV and reaction shots, disguising bad cuts, multi-angularity, and examining editing techniques from various scenes from features. The Sound Design classes focus on the creation of the sound design of the thesis films and delve into elements of advanced sound editing. Students also learn how to operate DVD-Studio Pro, to export their films into the compressor, and how to create menu options on  DVDs. Instructional methods include lecture and in-class demonstration and discussion.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours as Editing in Filmmaking (7/08) (10/16 revalidation). NOTE: Each semester of the One-Year Filmmaking Program is an integrated, cross-disciplinary experience. Credit is recommended only after students complete all courses within a given semester.

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1: 70 hours (16 weeks). Version 2: 33 hours (16 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: September 2007 - September 2016. Version 2: October 2016 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss how to create a production book for a short film project; identify and evaluate the following production items: shooting script, shot list, floor plan, shooting schedule (shot by shot), storyboards (optional), Director's notes, break down of film and each scene; lined script (optional),visual materials (optional), detailed budget, contact list for crew and cast, shooting permits (when necessary), locations, transportation, call sheets, SAG paperwork (when applicable), equipment (copy of the equipment request form); recognize all the facets of producing a short film from budget, script breakdown, scheduling, to working with SAG actors; discuss how to build a reel, how to target and market work in the film festival circuit, how to network and break into the film industry; and create DVD' for distribution; and discuss the financial and legal components of raising money for a feature film project.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course explores all the facets of producing a student thesis film from creating a budget, a script break down, a shooting schedule based on the thesis script, how to apply and work with SAG actors. Students create a thesis production book that includes the following items: shooting script, shot list, floor plan, shooting schedule (shot by shot), storyboards (optional), director's notes: Breakdown of Film and Each Scene. Other possible aspects of the course include Lined Script (optional), Visual Materials (optional), Detailed Budget, Contact list for Crew, Contact list for Cast, Shooting Permits (when necessary), Locations, Transportation, Call Sheets, SAG paperwork (when applicable), Equipment (copy of the equipment request form). Students take a series of classes after their Thesis shoot that addresses "Life After NYFA". Students learn how to build a reel, target and market their work in the film festival circuit, network and break into the film industry, and create DVDs for distribution, and learn about the financial and legal components of raising money for a feature film project. Successful completion of this course enables students to produce a thesis Film.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours as Producing in Filmmaking (7/08). NOTE: Each semester of the One-Year Filmmaking Program is an integrated, cross-disciplinary experience. Credit is recommended only after a student completes all courses within a given semester. Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaurate degree category, 1 semester hour as Producing in Filmmaking (10/16 revalidation). NOTE: Each semester of the One-Year Filmmaking Program is an integrated, cross-disciplinary experience. Credit is recommended only after students complete all courses within a given semester. 

Location:

New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY

Length:

15 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

October 2011 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: employ sound creative judgments about the filmmaking art and apply these to their own future projects and filmmaking careers; utilize filmmaking techniques of successful filmmakers, to achieve a professional level of filmmaking expertise; and develop a rudimentary knowledge of the trajectory of world cinema history.

Instruction:

This course continues the historical development of the evolution of the motion picture art form as a visual storytelling medium and the motion picture industry from their inceptions.  Students are given a thorough creative, technological and industrial view of the filmmaking art so they will be prepared for more advanced academic and production related studies and practice of filmmaking.  Major topics include: American film development though the impact of certain specific international film movements and visual styles will also be explored. Instructional methods include: film viewings (both in and out of class) and related presentations by the instructor.  The instructor further moderates and guides pertinent class discussions.  Students are required to prepare and present journal entries for each film. Prerequisite:  pecial Topics: Cinema Studies I.

Credit recommendation:

NOTE: Credit recommendations are listed under Special Topics Overview: One Year Filmmaking Program-Semesters One and Two (10/16).

Location:

New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.

Length:

18 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

October 2011 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: write effective casting notices; know where to place audition notices for prospective talent; organize a casting call; select appropriate audition material based on thesis needs; run professional auditions; assess which actors are suitable for callbacks; create an effective rehearsal plan; and collaborate with actors to improvise and improve thesis scripts.

Instruction:

This course consists of six classes that allow students to apply the introduction they received in Special Topics: Directing Actors I  and move it to a deeper level. Major topics include: writing casting notices, what to look for in headshots and resumes, selecting appropriate scenes for an audition, watching audition tapes analytically, and audition audition etiquette. The goal of the course is to give the students the tools they need to cast their thesis projects effectively.  Prerequisite: Directing Actors I.

Credit recommendation:

NOTE: Credit recommendations are listed under Special Topics Overview: One Year Filmmaking Program-Semesters One and Two (10/16).

Location:

New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.

Length:

9 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

October 2011 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a floor plan, choose a location and diagram a blocking scheme for their thesis film; apply the components of designing a set to their thesis film; demonstrate how different materials and textures support the design of their thesis film; employ art direction, costume and props in the character design of their thesis film; apply all of the concepts introduced in this course to the pre-production and shooting of workshop films as well as a final Thesis Film; and practice a deeper application of the art of visual storytelling.

Instruction:

The course consists of three classes: the first class (Production Design #4) focuses on visual design as it pertains to theme, including the use of architecture and an introduction to mood boards and drafting basics. The second class (Production Design #5) addresses set construction methods and tricks and the psychology of color.  In the third class (Production Design #6), students review the skill and magic of scenic painting and the application of all production design techniques to their upcoming thesis films. Prerequisite: Special Topics I: Production Design I.

Credit recommendation:

NOTE: Credit recommendations are listed under Special Topics Overview: One Year Filmmaking Program-Semesters One and Two (10/16).

Location:

New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.

Length:

27 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

October 2011 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate practical audio production and post-production skills and theoretical knowledge necessary to apply in a film environment. These skills include fluency in equipment and software operation, appropriate application of techniques and proper communication on and off set.

Instruction:

The course consists of nine classes. Major topics include: audio/sound fundamentals, dialogue and wild recording, the role of sound personnel, multi-track recorder set up, microphone techniques, proper procedures, wireless systems, audio workflow, file formats, critical monitoring, sound reports, creating an optimal environment with absorption material, and introduction to post-production sound. Prerequisite: FIL 170 Sound I.

Credit recommendation:

NOTE: Credit recommendations are listed under Special Topics Overview: One Year Filmmaking Program-Semesters One and Two (10/16).

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