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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

One-year Filmmaking Program - Semester 1

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:

Course 1: Version 1: 223 hours (16 weeks). Course 2: Version 1: 333 hours (16 weeks). Course 1: Version 2: 103 hours (16 weeks). Course 2: Version 2: 48 hours (16 weeks). 

Dates:

Course 1 and 2: Version 1: September 2007 - September 2016.  Course 1 and 2: Version 2: October 2016 - December 2019. 

Objectives:

Course 1: Version 1 and 2:  Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: create a floor plan, shot list, shooting schedule, lined script, and director's notes for any film project they direct; examine the components of designing a shot, including how to maintain spatial, temporal, graphic, and narrative continuity, how to utilize music as score, soundtrack, and source music, and how to create and direct the dramatic beats in a script; discuss the responsibilities of each crew member's role in a shoot, set protocol, and the order of commands on a film set; make use of blocking, staging, and the use of props for creating a character; discuss different approaches to directing dialogue, and integrate improvisational techniques in rehearsal and on set; explore acting techniques to better communicate with their actors in directing a credible and interesting performance; apply acting techniques in the shooting of a scene from a script in which the student directs and acts in; deconstruct scenes from features and shorts to identify different approaches to directing a film. Course 2: Version 1 and 2: Students will be able to: discuss the roles and responsibilities of a variety of Crew Positions such as Cinematographer, Assistant Camera, and Gaffer/Grip; budget and schedule for a short film shoot; determine the different budget categories: Film/Video stock, Film Development and Processing, Post-Production, Cast and Crew, Locations, Craft Services, Transportation, Art Department, Casting, Insurance, Contingencies, and Distribution; schedule a shoot and implement daily and weekly shooting schedule strategies.

Instruction:

Course 1: Version 1 and 2: This course introduces students to the language and craft of film directing. The directing classes prepare students for the film projects they will shoot and serves as the venue for screening and critiquing their films throughout the course. Students write, direct, produce, and edit seven short film projects. Directing classes cover the following subjects: directing the camera, principles of mise-en-scene, introduction to directing actors, shot planning, principles of continuity filmmaking, directing music and montage, dramatic breakdown of a script, the use of staging and blocking and production design to create character and sub-text in a scene, approaches to directing dialogue, and different approaches to subjective versus objective dramatic beats through point of view. Students explore acting techniques to better communicate with their actors in directing a credible and interesting performance. Students give a director's presentation based on their semester one film preparation in class. Successful completion of this course enables students to continue on to FIL210 Director's Craft, with an emphasis on thesis film completion. Course 2: Version 1 and 2: This course provides a practical application of learning from all the components in the directing, writing, cinematography, sound recording, and editing level one courses as they relate to the making of a film. Students work in a variety of crew positions such as Cinematographer, Assistant Camera, Sound Recordist, and Gaffer/Grip on their fellow student shoots for the first four film projects. Students take a budgeting and scheduling class where they learn the fundamentals and techniques of budgeting and scheduling for a short film. Students also produce the films they will direct in the first semester: mise-en-scene film, continuity film, music film, fourth film, Chekhovian Film, POV Film, and semester one film. Successful completion of this course enables students to continue on to FIL260 Production Two, with an emphasis on thesis film completion.

Credit recommendation:

 Course 1 and 2: Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours, distributed as follows: 4 semester hours as Directing in Filmmaking and 2 semester hours as Production in Filmmaking (7/08) (10/16 revalidation). NOTE: Each semester of the One-Year Filmmaking Program is an integrated, cross-disciplinary experience. Credit is recommended only after students complete all courses within a given semester.

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:
67.5 hours (16 weeks).
Dates:

September 2007 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: operate an Arriflex-S 16mm non-sync film camera: load and unload daylight spools; affect focus and depth of field with the use of different lenses; describe the properties of a wide-angle, medium, and telephoto lens; calculate a proper exposure with a Sekonic light meter, and shoot slow motion and fast motion; identify how to shoot an Exposure Test, Light Meter Test, a Lens Test, a Focus Test, and a Frame rate test with the Arriflex-S Camera; recognize a three-point lighting set up, and discuss the differences between key, fill, and back light; assess different characteristics of hard and soft lighting and implement the uses of diffusion, gels, blackwrap, flexfill, and determining wattage and voltage and amp with each light unit; judge how to implement lighting ratios; gauge the latitude of film stocks; operate a Panasonic DVX100a camera; discuss DV technology and CCD technology; utilize shutter speed, frame modes, scene files, and DVX scene menus; differentiate and apply how to light for digital vs. film; discuss exposure for DV; discuss the crew roles as a Cinematographer and Assistant Cameraman with both camera packages; and recognize what the crew roles are as a Director, Director of Photography, Assistant Camera, and Gaffer and Grip.

Instruction:

This course trains students how to use the 16mm Arriflex-S motion picture camera and its accessories. Students learn how to load the camera and take light readings and perform test shoots to learn about the latitude of the film stock, how to get a correct exposure, the effect of different lenses, focus pulling, and in-camera effects. In lighting class, students examine the fundamental lighting techniques through shooting test on film. As they progress through the workshop, students explore how to support the mood of the story with lighting choices and they experiment with expressive lighting styles. The Cinematography Labs are hands-on workshops in which students stage and shoot scene exercises under the supervision of the instructor. The technical aspects of filmmaking are seen as tools to realize the story. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours as Cinematography in Filmmaking (7/08) (10/16 revalidation). NOTE: Each semester of the One-Year Filmmaking Program is an integrated, cross-disciplinary experience. Credit is recommended only after students complete all courses within a given semester.

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1: 72.5 hours (16 weeks). Version 2: 36 hours (16 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: September 2007 - September 2016. Version 2: October 2016 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the principles of visual and dramatic storytelling, the dramatic components of a protagonist, an antagonist, the creation of conflict on an inner, personal and social level in the dramaturgy of their stories; recognize scenes that are composed of dramatic beats, a turning point, and a dramatic arc; discriminate the principles of 3-Act Story Structure: how to design a precipitating event, an inciting incident, escalation, complications, turning points, crisis decisions, climax and plot resolutions; identify and discuss proper screenplay format with regards to scene slugs, description, character name, dialogue, title page, and the use of margins; recognize characterizations versus true/inner character in protagonists and identify cast design functions; differentiate the properties of a short story versus a feature length story, evaluate the dramatic construction of a scene, and generate story ideas, step-outlines, treatments, and drafts of a script; define the elements of classical design, minimalism, and expressionism in their story-telling approach; assess effective dialogue; discern the difference between text and subtext in a scene and script; execute the twelve steps of the Hero's Journey as it relates to storytelling in feature length films.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course introduces students to the craft and techniques of screenwriting as a venue for work shopping their scripts for their film projects. Students write a script for their first quarter film and semester one film. Major topics include: introduction to visual and dramatic storytelling, screenplay format, 3-act story structure, character development and cast design, pitching, a writer's method, shorts versus features, classical design, minimalism, and anti-structure, writing realistic dialogue, and classical myth structure in film. Successful completion of this course enables students to continue on to FIL230 Screenwriting II, with an emphasis on thesis film completion.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours as Screenwriting in Filmmaking (7/08). NOTE: Each semester of the One-Year Filmmaking Program is an integrated, cross-disciplinary experience. Credit is recommended only after a student completes all courses within a given semester. Version 2:  In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour as Screenwriting in Filmmaking (10/16 revaldiation). NOTE: Each semester of the One-Year Filmmaking Program is an integrated, cross-disciplinary experience. Credit is recommended only after students complete all courses within a given semester.

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1: 186.5 hours (16 weeks). Version 2: 135 hours (16 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: September 2007 - September 2016. Version 2: October 2016 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the fundamental differences between linear and non-linear editing; operate and edit with Final Cut Pro (FCP) software and the Apple computer; use a hard drive to store media and film projects; log and capture media, computer shortcuts, and print to video; discuss the principles of action match cuts, cutting on movement, jump cuts, and how to navigate the time line, canvas, and toolbars of FCP; relate the steps to import music into FCP, how to cut to music, how to create transitions such as fades and dissolves, how to design and generate titles and motion in FCP, how to use of filters, how to create multiple sound tracks and use room tone, sound effects, dialogue, voice over, and music in the creation of their sound design; and discuss the fundamentals of editing overlapping dialogue and creating special effects using Final Cut Pro.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Students learn how to operate the digital editing system, Final Cut Pro (FCP). Through in class lecture and demonstration, students learn how to use a hard drive to store their media and film projects, how to log and capture media, implement the computer shortcuts on the keyboards, and put into action printing their projects to DVD. Students compose action match cuts, cutting on movement, jump cuts, and montage in their films and comprehend how to navigate the timeline, canvas, and toolbars of FCP and learn how to use and import music into Final Cut Pro, examine how to cut to music, and discover how to create transitions such as fades and dissolves, and design and generate titles and motion, and employ the use of filters. Students construct and capitalize on how to create multiple sound tracks with the use of room tone, sound effects, dialogue, voice-over, and music in the creation of their sound design. Finally, they edit their seven film projects on Final Cut Pro. Successful completion of this course enables students to continue on to FIL240 Editing Two, with an emphasis on thesis film completion.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours as Editing in Filmmaking (7/08) (10/16 revalidation). NOTE: Each semester of the One-Year Filmmaking Program is an integrated, cross-disciplinary experience. Credit is recommended only after students complete all courses within a given semester.

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1: 20 hours (16 weeks). Version 2: 18 hours (16 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: September 2007 - September 2016. Version 2: October 2016 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: record sound using the Fostex Recorder and the Wendt Mixer; use the audio signal chain, the recording and playback process; record using various microphones; solve potential sound problems; and discuss necessary steps for preparing for post.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course is designed to give student filmmakers practical hands on experience in a workshop environment. The course covers the basic and most common devices for analog and digital recording and provides training in the importance of acquiring usable location sound for a smooth transition into post-production. Other topics include: basic sound recording techniques in the field, production sound effects, ambient sound, production dialogue recording, analog and digital sound equipment, digital cameras and microphones, basics of sound theory, the difference between analog and digital recordings and the on set procedures a recordist must adhere to for a successful recording and sound effects. Students learn how to record sound using the Fostex Recorder and the Wendt Mixer and use the  audio signal chain, the recording and playback process using the Fostex and Wendt mixer, how to record using wireless microphones, how to solve potential sound problems, and preparing for post. Successful completion of this course enables students to continue on to successfully record sound on their Thesis film.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour as Sound Recording in Filmmaking (7/08) (10/16 revalidation). NOTE: Each semester of the One-Year Filmmaking Program is an integrated, cross-disciplinary experience. Credit is recommended only after students complete all courses within a given semester. 

Location:

New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.

Length:

21 hours (16 weeks). 

Dates:

October 2011 - December 2019. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: employ sound creative judgments about the filmmaking art and apply these to their own future projects and filmmaking careers; employ filmmaking techniques of successful filmmakers to achieve a professional level of filmmaking expertise; and develop a rudimentary knowledge of the trajectory of world cinema history.

Instruction:

This course introduces students to the evolution of the motion picture art form as a visual storytelling medium and the motion picture industry from their inceptions. Students are given a thorough creative, technological and industrial view of the filmmaking art to prepare for more advanced academic and production related studies and practice of filmmaking. The approach is historically developmental. The course considers primarily American film development through the impact of certain specific international film movements/styles. Instruction includes film viewings, both in and out of class and related presentations by the instructor. The instructor further moderates and guides pertinent class discussions. Students are required to prepare and present journal entries for each film.

Credit recommendation:

NOTE: Credit recommendations are listed under Special Topics Overview: One Year Filmmaking Program-Semesters One and Two (10/16).

Location:

New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.

Length:

18 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

October 2011 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze scripts from the actors' point of view, identify the characters' objectives, obstacles, and sub-text, and practice being actors in the production workshops, and evaluate the work of actors so they are better equipped to anticipate the needs of actors and communicate with them in their own language. 

Instruction:

The course consists of five classes: the first is an acting class designed to teach student directors to use basic acting skills to develop the behavior of the character. The remaining four classes help directors work with actors for their production workshop projects. Each week, students participate in rehearsing the scenes to be shot that week. Rehearsals consist of breaking down the scenes for scene elements, character objectives, and blocking. Class sessions are devoted to actors’ tools, text analysis, and blocking and rehearsal of scenes. These scenes are filmed in the Digital Production Workshop class. Both directors and actors are critiqued for their work in creating these scene elements.

Credit recommendation:

NOTE: Credit recommendations are listed under Special Topics Overview: One Year Filmmaking Program-Semesters One and Two (10/16). 

Location:

New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.

Length:

9 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

October 2011 - December 2019. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: recognize and discuss what is a documentary film; identify and explain the ethics and morals of documentary filmmaking; differentiate and describe the different filmmaking approaches of documentary films; appraise and contrast different interviewing techniques; analyze and describe the similarities and differences between documentary and fiction filmmaking; recognize and identify various directing techniques employed in documentary filmmaking; and recognize and identify various camera techniques employed in documentary filmmaking.

Instruction:

Through classroom lectures, students are taught the craft of documentary film directing. The first semester course introduces students to major aspects and genres of documentary filmmaking, including various ways to handle the multiple technical, aesthetic and ethical challenges facing the documentary filmmaker. Other topics include: pre-production, filming, post-production, and distribution.

Credit recommendation:

NOTE: Credit recommendations are listed under Special Topics Overview: One Year Filmmaking Program-Semesters One and Two (10/16).

Location:

New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.

Length:

12 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

October 2011 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate the ability to breakdown a script scene-by-scene, identify critical script elements, create a day-by-day production schedule, create a scratch budget, and create a log line, a “look book” and a production binder for their First Quarter Film and Semester One Film.

Instruction:

The course consists of six classes: the first class is designed to teach student directors to use budgeting and scheduling techniques, which are then applied to their first semester film projects. The second class addresses pre-production techniques and a more detailed application of cast, setting, and shooting schedule. The third class explores “look books,” art direction, wardrobe and props. In the fourth class, students break into small groups for an exercise employing all of the previously explored topics.

Credit recommendation:

NOTE: Credit recommendations are listed under Special Topics Overview: One Year Filmmaking Program-Semesters One and Two (10/16).

Location:

New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY

Length:

9 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

October 2011 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will  be able to:  prepare a floor plan, choose a location and diagram a blocking scheme for their thesis film; apply the components of designing a set to their thesis film; demonstrate how different materials and textures support the design of their thesis film; employ art direction, costume and props in the character design of their thesis film; apply all of the concepts introduced in this course to the pre-production and shooting of workshop films as well as their final Thesis Film; and practice a deeper application of the art of visual storytelling.

Instruction:

The course consists of three classes: the first class (Production Design #4) focuses on visual design as it pertains to theme, including the use of architecture and an introduction to mood boards and drafting basics.  The second class (Production Design #5) addresses set construction methods and tricks, and the psychology of color. In the third class (Production Design #6), students review the skill and magic of scenic painting and the application of all production design techniques to their upcoming thesis films.

Credit recommendation:

NOTE: Credit recommendations are listed under Special Topics Overview: One Year Filmmaking Program-Semesters One and Two (10/16).

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