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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

One-year Acting for Film Program - Semester 1

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:
Course 1: 96 hours (16 weeks). Course 2: 6 hours (4 weeks).
Dates:

Course 1 and 2: September 2007 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Course 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: act comfortably in front of the camera with awareness of the demands and tools of film work; define film set terminology, with an emphasis on getting performances that are geared for a specific shot size; obtain on-camera experience shooting scripted scenes on location in and out of the classroom; define all film crewmembers' responsibilities and duties through the hands-on experience of each; begin to recognize what makes a good on-camera performance; capture strong performances on film; shoot on location with an understanding of acting techniques and procedures; review scenes shot for an understanding of the nature of the rough footage, re-shoots, and post-production procedures; knowledgeably critique an actor's work based on performance, physical and emotional consistency, and choices. Course 2: Students will be able to: define filmmaking terminology and differentiate the necessary information of four filmmaking arenas: directing, cinematography, editing, and producing; and discuss necessary film production activities in preparation for incorporating the knowledge of those activities on a set.

Instruction:

Course 1: In this course, students begin to get comfortable working in front of the camera. They learn the specific differences between acting for the stage and acting for film - what the camera sees and what the microphone hears - and how these differences dictate a performance on screen. Students learn to read, understand, and execute a short scene from a screenplay on film and to execute a script intelligently. Course 2:  Students learn directing, editing, producing, and cinematography from the actor's perspective. The intent is that learning the roles of all the players on a film set dramatically increases the actor's ability to collaborate with the filmmakers in developing dynamic performances.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Theatre, Drama, Communications, or Radio and Television (6/07) (8/08) (8/14 revalidation). NOTE: Course 1 and 2 must both be completed to receive credit.

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:

Course 1: Version 1 and 2: 48 hours (16 weeks). Course 2: Version 1: 12 hours (8 weeks). Course 2: Version 2: 20 hours (8 weeks).

Dates:

Course 1 and 2: Version 1: September 2007 - July 2014. Course 1 and 2: Version 2: August 2014 - December 2019. 

Objectives:

Course 1: Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: connect voice, body, and movement as an expressive whole; act with physical and vocal freedom and expression, without tension; apply the International Phonetic Alphabet toward developing Standard American speech. Course 1: Version 2: Students will be able to: experience a greater freedom of expression (vocally and physically) and be able to apply this work to character development and text; explain the relationship between physical and emotional life and apply these discoveries to acting choices; develop confidence in physical instincts; discover vocal freedom and release of tension; learn and use vocal and physical warm-up; acquire increased awareness of personal, physical, and vocal habits to bring their instrument to a neutral state and make specific character choices. Course 2: Version 1: Students will be able to:use the International Phonetic Alphabet in the scoring of a piece of text; recognize and reproduce the hallmarks of Standard American speech. Course 2: Version 2: Students will be able to: experience an increased auditory awareness of their own speech as well as that of their peers; learn how articulators engage to produce each vowel, diphthong, and consonant; practice producing phonemes in words and phrases and employ concepts of sense stress and operative words in their own work on text; practice a basic set of warm-up exercises; demonstrate an awareness of Standard American Speech and a means of working toward the production of speech; employ a technique to apply speech to text through the use of the Operative Words and Sense Stress; explain the importance of vowels and consonants in speech; successfully apply phonetics to text and accent work; and understand the basic tools and understanding for learning accents.

Instruction:

Course 1: Version 1 and 2: In this course, students learn to access their natural voice through relaxation exercises designed to improve alignment and alleviate habitual tension. Students study Standard American Speech and the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) in order to remove any regional dialects and attain more resonant speech. They also practice vocal characterization through text work and they begin to experiment with different ways of becoming physically present in their work. Elements of various approaches are taught, including some or all of the following: modern dance, yoga, Alexander technique, and Laban. Course 2: Version 1 and 2: In this course, students begin to develop a pleasing neutral mastery of the vowels and consonants of spoken English in order to open him/herself to the speech of the character being portrayed. Students are introduced to the basics of the International Phonetic Alphabet and Standard American speech and are taught to apply them to both Shakespearean and contemporary texts.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and 2: Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Theatre, Drama, Communications, or Radio and Television (6/07) (8/08). NOTE: Course 1 and 2 must both be completed to receive credit. Course 1 and 2: Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Theatre, Drama, Communications, or Radio and Television (6/07) (8/08) (8/14 revalidation). NOTE: Course 1 and 2 must both be completed to receive credit.

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:
Version 1: 96 hours (16 weeks). Version 2: 84 hours (16 weeks).
Dates:

Version 1: September 2007 -  July 2014. Version 2: August 2014 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: get in touch with sensibility and awareness to external and internal (imagination and personal experience) stimuli; break down natural inhibitions; prepare to approach scene work with intelligence, integrity, heart and emotional freedom; analyze and perform a text using exercises in dramatic action; apply observation and character studies through improvisation; explore and perform a monologue. Version 2: Students will be able to: demonstrate proper relaxation and preparation, targeting focus toward given circumstances; the role of imagination in generating a physical response in the actor; demonstrate the capacity to stand alone (without a partner) and perform with honesty and specificity; prepare and perform selected pieces assigned by the instructor; learn to select a piece that suits his/her voice and type (dramatic or comedic), and after memorization, personalization, sense memory, pursuit of a specific goal or outcome, role of the obstacles in increasing tension, and suspense, pacing, physicalization and physical connection to text.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course introduces students to exercises of the master acting teachers of the 20th century, including Stanislavski, Chekhov, Grotowski, Strasberg, and Adler, with a practical application of these exercises to build a foundation for future acting skills.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Theatre, Drama, Communications, or Radio and Television (6/07) (8/08). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Theatre, Drama, Communications, or Radio and Television (6/07) (8/08) (8/14 revalidation).

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1: 96 hours (16 weeks). Version 2: 84 hours (16 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: September 2007 - July 2014. Version 2: August 2014 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply advanced acting principles through the use of Sanford Meisner's approach for working originally and creating truthful and expressive behavior; find appropriate and emotionally stimulating given circumstances in a text and apply them in performance; act with focus, concentration, and flexibility. Version 2: Students will be able to: apply advanced acting principles through the use of Sanford Meisner's approach for working originally and creating truthful and expressive behavior and learn and demonstrate the principles of: basic and advanced repetition, conversational reality, living truthfully in the moment, and activity work.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course is geared toward honing actors' listening and responding skills. The first semester begins with improvisational exercises, where actors' attention is engaged entirely with his or her partner's simple, real behavior, as opposed to character interpretation, script analysis, or direction. Once this foundation has been established, students begin to apply this technique to scripted text. Emotional preparation through exercises and improvisation in scene work is emphasized. Some exercises include repetition exercises, knocking exercise, 3-moment exercise, coming home alone exercise, and improvisation working on attention shifts.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Theatre, Drama, Communications, or Radio and Television (6/07) (8/08). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Theatre, Drama, Communications, or Radio and Television (6/07) (8/08) (8/14 revalidation).

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 24 hours (8 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: September 2007 - July 2014. Version 2: August 2014 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: use the skills required to audition successfully in a variety of circumstances; create the actor's tools of the trade, such as headshots, resumes, and cover letters; analyze casting breakdowns, self-marketing strategies, branding/positioning, etc.; prepare a business plan for securing work as an actor. Version 2: Students will be able to: learn how to walk into a room and present themselves in a professional and prepared manner; confidently execute a slate; explain the differences between a co-star, guest star, film, and commercial auditioning; quickly analyze the text of a scene for cold reads; make strong and appropriate choices in an audition context; and discuss what makes an effective headshot and resume.

Instruction:

Version 1: This course introduces students to the business of acting and incorporates cover-letter writing, resume writing, headshots, and how to make a positive presentation to the industry. Students also learn etiquette and unique skills needed to audition well. Students work in a mock audition format, including cold reading, working from sides, and general interviews, which are videotaped for critique. Version 2: This course introduces students to the basics of audition techniques and prepares them for their first professional on-camera film audition. Students prepare for the Open Casting, present weekly mock auditions, practice audition techniques used in film, television, commercials, and cold readings. Students are given a brief introduction to the business and an overview of industry standards that are covered in ACT252 The Business of Acting course.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Theatre, Drama, Communications, or Radio and Television (6/07) (8/08) (8/14 revalidation).

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:
Version 1: 48 hours (16 weeks). Version 2: 24 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:

Version 1: September 2007 - July 2014. Version 2: August 2014 - December 2019. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define and identify the elements of a story; identify the given circumstances of a script; break down a script into beats for performance; assign an active verb or action for each line of dialogue and physical action; start to create a character based on facts given in the script; apply prior course learning to the analysis of a Shakespearean text; perform a Shakespearean soliloquy in an audition situation; and examine and perform sonnets, monologues, and soliloquies paying particular attention to tempi, dynamics, and diction.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: In this course, students begin to break down a script for performance and learn the structure and elements of story and dramatic action, and how to make acting choices based on dialogue, stage directions, and given circumstances. Over the course of instruction, students move from analysis to the practical application of scripted scene work.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Theatre, Drama, Communications, or Radio and Television (6/07) (8/08). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Theatre, Drama, Communications, or Radio and Television (6/07) (8/08) (8/14 revalidation).

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:
Version 1: 48 hours (16 weeks). Version 2: 24 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:

Version 1: September 2007 - July 2014. Version 2: August 2014 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define and identify the elements of a story; identify the given circumstances of a script; break down a script into beats for performance; assign an active verb or action for each line of dialogue and physical action; begin to create a character based on facts given in the script; apply prior course learning to the analysis of a Shakespearean text; perform a Shakespearean soliloquy in an audition situation; examine and perform sonnets, monologues, and soliloquies paying particular attention to tempi, dynamics, and diction. Version 2: Students will be able to: demonstrate a basic analysis of Shakespeare's text; take direction on an interpretation of the text by a director; demonstrate the diction necessary to communicate the text clearly; and competently demonstrate a Shakespeare performance in an audition situation.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: In this course, students begin to break down a script for performance and learn the structure and elements of story and dramatic action, and how to make acting choices based on dialogue, stage directions, and given circumstances. Over the course of instruction, students move from analysis to the practical application of scripted scene work.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Theatre, Drama, Communications, or Radio and Television (6/07) (8/08). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Theatre, Drama, Communications, or Radio and Television (6/07) (8/08) (8/14 revalidation).

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 24 hours (8 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1 and 2: September 2007 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: act spontaneously and adapt quickly to changing circumstances in auditions, scene, and camera work; make use of basic components of improvisation, including agreement, endowment, labeling, environment, and relationships; recognize what makes a good scene work and how to develop emotional choices in the moment. Version 2: Students will be able to: create given circumstances based on free association; learn to say yes to associations created by a partner actor; function as a member of an ensemble; create improvised characters, relationships, and environments; and act spontaneously and adapt quickly to changing circumstances.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2:  Students learn the basics of improvisation in the form of warm-up games and short form exercises, such as mirroring and two-person scene work. 

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Theatre, Drama, Communications, or Radio and Television (6/07) (8/08) (8/14 revalidation).

Location:
New York Film Academy, 17 Battery Place, New York, NY.
Length:
24 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:

September 2009 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: study key film performances and historically important films by exploring works from the inception of the medium through the first decade of the twenty-first century; analyze the development of a character in a film; evaluate different acting styles and how they have evolved through the development of film; analyze a film for key elements such as: text analysis, character objectives, conflicts, and actor choices including the commitment and focus of the actor, muscular isolation, tension, and range and quality of expression, vocal work (range of pitch, volume, use of breath), speech work (articulation, use of operative words and phrases), use of shot size (close, mid, wide), character choices and physicalization of character, range of physical expression, diversity of acting choices, imagination and creativity within given limitations of shot, use of silence, pursuit of objective and range of tactics, use of Tempo-Rhythm and Pacing in movement and speech, use of opposites and juxtaposition (fast movement/slow speech or vice versa), use of balance, repetition, equivalence, and omission.

Instruction:

In this course, students view and participate in discussions of pivotal film performances and develop an appreciation and technical understanding of the methods, choices, and effects of various styles of acting. The overall goal of the course is to give students a reference point for key performances and a working vocabulary of historically important films.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Theatre, Drama, Communications, or Radio and Television (8/14).

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