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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Active Courses - New York City Fire Academy

Titles of all evaluated learning experiences in Active Courses - New York City Fire Academy

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
New York City Fire Academy, Randalls Island.
Length:
Version 1 and 2: 40 hours (4 days).
Dates:

Version 1: November 2004 - May 2015. Version 2: June 2015 - Present. 

Objectives:
Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of this course, students will become familiar with the procedures for Advanced High Angle Rescue Operations and be able to: construct high line systems, including anchoring systems and tensioning of high lines using mechanical advantage.
Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Major topics include: New York State Advanced Rescue I and II, calculating line length, advanced anchoring, military rigging, construction, tensioning operation, high lines, offset and movable directional advanced rescue skills, and lead climbing for tower and crane rescue. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, video, demonstrations and competency based performance testing.

Credit recommendation:
Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Science Administration, Occupational Health and Safety, Engineering Technology, Rescue or Emergency Medical Services (7/10). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Science Administration, Occupational Health and Safety, or Engineering Technology (6/15 revalidation).
Location:

SUNY Maritime College Pool, Bronx, NY; Dutch Springs Dive, Bethlehem, PA; Ocean Dive, Rockaway, NY.

Length:

50 hours (1 week).

Dates:

May 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will hone their dive skills and take an increased role in planning and organizing dives.  Students apply reinforced skills in various conditions of increased difficulty- including: night or low visibility, deep water dives, search and recovery, and surf diving or current diving.

Instruction:

Instruction for the class includes both lecture and practical experiences. This 50-hour course reinforces basic skills, dive planning, dive safety and physiology, skills mastered in Open Water Diver (SOC 251). It also provides an increased role in dive planning and dive practice with an increased degree of difficulty. NOTE: Course requirements exceed the number of dives mandated by National Association of Underwater Instructors NAUI. Prerequisite: Open Water Diver (SOC 251) or equivalent.

Credit recommendation:

Credit recommendation:  In the lower division baccalaureate/ associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Physical Education, Recreation, or Fire Science (6/18).

Location:
New York City Fire Academy, Randalls Island.
Length:

Version 1, 2, and 3: 40 hours (4 days).

Dates:
Version 1: January 2001 - August 2007. Version 2: September 2007 - September 2008. Version 3: October 2008 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the procedures for a trench incident assessment and demonstrate the various stabilization techniques used to secure a trench in preparation for an evacuation emergency. Students will also be able to explain various support operations and stabilization systems to safely operate in a trench for patient stabilization and extrication and be able to safely manage and operate in a trench rescue and correctly use the tools necessary to safely perform such tasks.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Major topics include: trench operations; con-ed vacuum truck demo; skills station assemble; trench panels; set panels in trench simulator; gin pole air bag rigging; t-shaped trench; and panel placement simulator.

Credit recommendation:
Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Fire Science, Emergency Medical Services, or Emergency Management (12/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fire Science, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Management, or Occupational Health and Safety (11/07) (10/08 revalidation) Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Science, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Management, or Occupational Health and Safety (7/10 revalidation) (6/15 revalidation).
Location:

Fort Totten, Bayside, NY

Length:

35 hours (1 week).

Dates:

January 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define the law enforcement authority and limitations of police officers, peace officers, and civilians in New York State; explain the role of the peace officer within the criminal justice system; describe the responsibilities and the standards for ethical conduct of peace officers; analyze fire scenes to determine if possible criminal activity was involved; and testify in court as a Law Enforcement Officer; and employ defensive tactics when necessary.

Instruction:

Major topics include: introduction to constitutional law, powers of a peace officer, New York State Criminal Procedure Law Provisions, ethics in law enforcement, legal system, enforcement procedures, civil law and liability, and conflict resolution.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Criminal Justice, Police Science, or Security Administration (6/15). NOTE: This course is only offered to FDNY Fire Protection Inspectors.

Location:
FDNY Training Bureau, Randalls Island, New York.
Length:

Version 1, 2, and 3:  80 Hours (10 Days).

Dates:

Version 1: January 2003 - January 2008. Version 2: February 2008 – May 2015. Version 3: June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:
Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: investigate and evaluate traffic collisions; accurately photograph and diagram traffic collisions; use data collected at the scene to perform detailed analysis to determine factors causing the collision. Version 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: gather proper measurements and data needed to produce a diagram of the accident scene; make diagrams by hand using the Blue Blitz or electronically with the Total Station; identify skid marks in the roadway and how these marks can determine possible cause of the accident and/or approximately how fast the vehicle was traveling; utilize FDNY procedures in investigating accidents; use controlled experiments and math skills; and differentiate between FDNY classifications of major or minor accidents.
Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course teaches students practical skills to investigate and evaluate motor vehicle accidents. Major topics include: physical evidence; mathematical principles needed for time, distance and motion; speed estimates from skid marks, scuff marks, and airborne situations; crash scene photography; diagramming the crash scene using traffic templates; conducting interviews. Version 3: In addition to Version 1 and 2, additionally: acceleration and deceleration, critical curve speed, falls, flips, and vaults, crash scene investigation; and mock accident.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Science, Criminal Justice, or Occupational Safety (5/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Science, Criminal Justice, Police Science, or Safety Engineering (10/08 revalidation) (7/10 revalidation) (6/15 revalidation).

Location:
Version 1, 2, and 3: New York City Fire Academy, Randalls Island, New York.
Length:

Version 1: 192 hours (5 weeks). Version 2: 280 hours (7 weeks). Version 3: 210 hours (6 weeks). Version 4: 280 hours (8 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: January 2001 – December 2002. Version 2: January 2003 - January 2008. Version 3: February 2008 - May 2015. Version 4: June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: oversee and coordinate the operations in emergency fire, multiple casualty, and emergency medical incidents and perform the tasks of a middle level manager in the administration of multiple fire companies; demonstrate strategy and tactics of emergency response operations and supervision and leadership skills based upon operational policy and procedures of the New York City Fire Department. Version 2: Students will be able to: deploy, coordinate, command and control fire personnel during fire fighting operations; assess fire conditions and evaluate structural integrity of buildings throughout fire operations; develop proper firefighting strategies consistent with established safety parameters; implement the Incident Command System of control and coordination for operations; determine if the fire was accidental or suspicious; record all pertinent information regarding operations for necessary reports; be aware of hazardous materials and the resources available for mitigation; know building construction as it relates to fire travel and extension in various structures; display proper communications skills between units at the scene and dispatchers; know foam operations; determine effectiveness of on-scene resources and implementation of additional resources to manage the situation; oversee and coordinate the operations in emergency fire, multiple casualty and emergency medical incidents; and perform the tasks of a middle manager in administration of multiple fire companies.Version 3: Students will be able to: deploy, coordinate, command and control fire personnel during fire fighting operations; assess fire conditions and evaluate structural integrity of buildings throughout fire operations; develop proper firefighting strategies consistent with established safety parameters; implement the Incident Command System of control and coordination for operations; determine if the fire was accidental or suspicious; record all pertinent information regarding operations for necessary reports; be aware of hazardous materials and the resources available for mitigation; know building construction as it relates to fire travel and extension in various structures; display proper communications skills between units at the scene and dispatchers; know foam operations; determine effectiveness of on-scene resources and implementation of additional resources to manage the situation; oversee and coordinate the operations in emergency fire, multiple casualty and emergency medical incidents; perform the tasks of a middle manager in administration of multiple fire companies. Version 4: Newly promoted Chief Officers will be able to: perform the role of Incident Commander at structural fires as well as all types of emergency responses; interact with local community boards, the news media, and numerous outside agencies. Additionally, Chief Officers will be equipped with the training and resources to solve problems both routine and non-routine that they will experience in the field through effective use of Fire Department units as well as other emergency response agencies. Chief Officers will be familiar with the various branches of the fire service within the city of New York. They will know the capabilities of these branches and how to utilize them as needed. Lastly, Chief Officers will further develop and expand the leadership skills acquired as a frontline supervisor (i.e. Captain and Lieutenant) and apply them to their new position as a Battalion Chief in the New York City Fire Department. Successful completion of the course certifies Battalion Chiefs as liaisons to the New York City Transit Authority.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics include: the Incident Command System, safety, strategy and tactics, hazardous materials, foam operations, supervision, leadership, and high rise operations. Methods of instruction include lecture, audio/visual material, computer-assisted instruction, case studies, field trips, quizzes, and observations.
Version 2: Major topics include: management, leadership, safety coordination, hazardous materials, foam coordination, high rise and building, Incident Command System: fire investigation; communications, fire fighting strategies and tactics, and coordination of multiple incidents. Methods of instruction include lecture, projects, power point presentations, ride along/mentoring and a final examination. The purpose of this course is to provide rising battalion chiefs with an orientation to a middle manager position in the administration of Battalion Command and present the knowledge necessary to be a commander of fire and emergency incidents incorporating the Incident Command System, and to develop proper firefighting strategies.
Version 3: Major topics include: management, leadership, safety coordination, hazardous materials, foam coordination, high-rise buildings, Incident Command System: fire investigation; communications, fire fighting strategies and tactics, and coordination of multiple incidents.
Version 4: In addition to topics listed in previous versions, Chiefs participate in hands-on training; field trips to new buildings, and participate in forty hours of field mentoring

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Strategic Management of Fire and Rescue Operations, and 1 semester hour in Hazardous Materials and 1 semester hour in Leadership (9/02).

Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category 4 semester hours in Strategic Management of Fire and Rescue Operations, and 2 semester hours in Hazardous Materials (5/06 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). 

 Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours, distributed as follows: 6 semester hours in Fire Science Administration OR 5 semester hours in Fire Science Administration and 1 semester hour in Hazardous Materials OR 4 semester hours in Fire Science, 1 semester hour in Hazardous Materials and 1 semester hour in Management or Leadership (10/08 revalidation) (7/10 revalidation).

Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 9 semester hours, distributed as follows: 6 semester hours in Fire Science Administration and 3 semester hours in Leadership or Management (6/15 revalidation). NOTE: This course and Battalion Chief Training Course are essentially the same course evaluated by two different agencies. Both exhibits have been retained to minimize confusion.

Location:
New York City Fire Academy, Randalls Island, New York
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 35 Hours (5 days).

Dates:
Version 1: December 2003 - December 2008. Version 2: January 2009 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: perform the functions of a Battalion Firefighter; balance daily staffing issues including hiring of needed overtime firefighters; processing and distributing department reports; compose fire reports; safely respond to and from incidents; organize required information; communicate effectively on the department radios; give accurate and complete preliminary and progress reports; provide critical information to the incident commander; operate department communication devices; properly size up fires and other emergency incidents; properly identify the various building types; function as an integral part of the incident command team; and gather and record information required for fire reports.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Major topics include: administrative duties; staffing related duties; incident command; staffing in-basket exercise; national transit safety course; safety discussion; radio protocol; communication devices; NYFIRS computer training lecture; NYFIRS practical training; fire ground operations; preliminary and progress reports; and building construction.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate division category, 1 semester hour in Fire Protection Technology or Fire Science (10/08 revalidation) (6/13 revalidation) (6/18 revalidation).  (5/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). 

Location:
New York City Fire Academy, Randalls Island.
Length:

Version 1: 40 hours (1 week). Version 2: 105 hours (15 days). Version 3: 160 hours (4 weeks). Version 4: 175 hours (5 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: May 2004 - March 2007. Version 2: April 2007 - December 2009. Version 3: January 2010 - June 2016. Version 4: July 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: achieve the goals of the department; discuss the dynamics of leadership; and supervise subordinates as to the best course of action in various emergency and non emergency situations. Version 4: Students will be able to: apply classroom lessons to function safely and efficiently as Company commander (Captain) and as Acting Battalion Chief both administratively and at fires and emergencies; effectively operate various department communication devices; strategically deploy fire companies at fires and emergencies; recognize and mitigate developing dangerous situations; function as Resource Unit Leader; utilize the Electronic Fireground Accountablity System (EFAS); become certified in several areas, including: Incident Command System, International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) course Emergency Response to Terrorism; operate at terrorist incidents; discuss the working of the automatic fire alarm panel and automatic sprinkler systems; explain the utility system infrastructure and operate safely at utility emergencies and fire; describe operation of the Full Operational Capability (FOC) and how it relates to jobs in the field. Also, students also develop a working understanding of building construction and its possible effects on field operations. In an administrative capacity, students effectively conduct various duties of a company commander; carry out administrative duties of a Battalion Chief; conduct effective building inspections and maintain accurate building records; enter responses into the NYFIRS system; withdraw information from the MIRS system; complete 4 10-hour days of mentoring and ride alongs with an experienced chief in various parts of the city; and discuss leadership principles and apply them to routine and emergency operations. 

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Major topics include: concerns of an acting battalion chief; command and control; fire ground/administration; various incident command scenarios; fire ground communication; inter-agency protocols; hazmat overview; Special Operations Command; safety/building construction; leadership; weapons of mass destruction; and terrorism awareness. Version 3 and 4: Same as Versions 1 and 2 with Building Inspection process; sprinkler and alarm panels; NIST smoke movement study, expanding ops; high rise operations; use of statistics; counseling and conflict of interest.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Administration or Tactics and Strategies (12/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Administration and 2 semester hours in General Fire Science (11/07). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Fire Service Administration, Fire Service Management, and 3 semester hours in Fire Science, or Strategies and Tactics (6/11 revalidation). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours, distributed as follows: 4 semester hours in Fire Service Administration, Fire Service Management AND 4 semester hours in Fire Science or Strategies and Tactics (7/16 revalidation). 

Location:
New York City Fire Academy, Randalls Island.
Length:
Version 1 and 2: 40 hours (4 days). Version 3: 80 hours (5 days).
Dates:
Version 1: January 1995 - August 2007. Version 2: September 2007 – May 2015. Version 3: June 2015 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge and skills to perform the rescue of trapped victim(s) of a structural collapse. Version 2: Students will be able to: make assessments of the different types of collapses; discuss how to stabilize and shore up weakened structures; and perform technical rescue-tunneling and breaching for rescue of trapped victims. Version 3: In addition to outcomes listed in Version 1 and 2, students will be able to: calculate and apply mathematical equations; size up an incident action plan and proper utilization techniques and implement these techniques to support collapse structures to enable safe and search rescue operations in or near a collapse structure. Students also learn about and use heavy rigging procedures to move and/or stabilize heavy objects to facilitate life safety operations.

Instruction:

Version 1 or 2: Major topics include: basic building construction, warning signs and causes of collapse, shoring, collapse rescue methods, initial response methods, concrete cutting techniques, crush injury syndrome, and void search operations. Version 3: This course now includes Advanced Shoring (SOC 306) and teaches students the skills, techniques, and use of tools to function effectively at structural collapse operations. Major topics include: advanced shoring, vertical shoring, rigging equipment and operations, crane/rigging, basic collapse, crush injury syndrome, building construction, and safety. Methods of instruction include: lecture, examinations, case studies of FDNY collapse operations, scenario-based skill evolutions, and team and group activities.

Credit recommendation:
Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fire Service, Emergency Management, or Emergency Medical Services (5/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fire Service, Emergency Management, Occupational Health and Safety, or Emergency Medical Services (10/08 revalidation) (7/10 revalidation). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Fire Science or 2 semester hours in Occupational Health and Safety and 2 semester hours in Building Construction (6/15 revalidation).
Location:
New York City Fire Academy, Randalls Island.
Length:

Versions 1, 2, and 3: 40 hours (4 days).

Dates:
Version 1: January 1995 - November 2007. Version 2: December 2007 - December 2012. Version 3: January 2013 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: perform the rescue of a trapped victim of a structural collapse; and mitigate confined space emergencies through the use of knots, riggings, and safe victim hauling techniques. Version 3: Same as in Version 1 and 2, additionally: apply confined space rescue skills to assess and analyze a confined space incident; effectively conduct rescue operations to safely secure and extricate victims; identify various techniques to secure area; and protect rescuers during rescue operations.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2 and 3: Major topics covered in the course include: personal protective equipment; incident command system; confined space rescue hazards; confined space awareness; atmospheric monitoring; rope and other software; confined space knots; lowering systems operations; belay (safety) systems operations; patient packaging; anchoring systems; retrieval systems operations; and mechanical advantage theory applications. Methods of instruction include: lectures, audio/visual material, hands-on activities, practical skills evolution, observations, tests, and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fire Science, Emergency Medical Service Technology, or Emergency Management (5/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education).  Version 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fire Science, Emergency Medical Service Technology, Emergency Management, or Occupational Health and Safety (11/07) (10/08 revalidation) (7/10 revalidation) (5/12 revalidation) (7/17 revalidation). 

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