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National Paralegal College

Organization description
Source of official student records
Titles of all evaluated learning experiences
Descriptions and credit recommendations
All CCR Online listings

National Paralegal College, a NCCRS member organization since January 2013, National Paralegal College (NPC) provides quality Internet-based education and training for students seeking careers in the paralegal field. NPC seeks to enable those students whose lifestyles lead them to opt for distance education to obtain comprehensive paralegal training and meet their educational goals without having to compromise on interactivity and academic quality.

National Paralegal College offers programs leading to a Certificate in Paralegal Studies, which can be completed in 7 months; an Associate of Paralegal Studies degree, which can be completed in 15 months; and a Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies degree, which can be completed in under 3 years. All programs consist of highly interactive structured courses.

Source of official student records: Registrar, National Paralegal College, 717 E. Maryland Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona.


Titles of all evaluated learning experiences

BUSINESS

GOVERNMENT/HISTORY
LAW
MISCELLANEOUS

Descriptions and credit recommendations

BUSINESS

Business Writing (ENG-102)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: May 2008 - Present.
Objectives Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain the centrality of clear and efficient writing in today's business environment and the major obstacles therein; adjust sentence style to improve clarity, determination, and emphasis; employ gender-neutral language according to current workplace standards; perform accurate audience analyses and correlate them with specific purposes; create coherent outlines and apply a range of organizational techniques; discuss and apply strategies for motivation and persuasion and apply them to sales letters, claims, and proposals; responsibly gather and analyze data from primary and secondary sources; plan and execute periodic reports, project proposals, and research proposals; write reports and presentations in a collaborative setting; and compose effective resumes and application letters.
Instruction: This course teaches students how to plan, compose, and execute effective business documents according to current professional standards. Emphasis is focused on considerations of purpose, audience, organization, and style and provides broad guidelines for composition and targeted strategies for specific kinds of documents. Special attention is given to the collection and analysis of data for use in reports and presentations. Major topics covered in the course are: understanding business communication; interpersonal communication skills; the writing process; revisions; routine and persuasive messages; report planning and writing; data management; oral presentations; and employment communication. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business Writing or Business (1/13).

International Business (BUS-201)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: - April 2010 - Present.
Objectives Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify national differences in politics and culture; illustrate the effects of ethics on international business; explain international trade theory; describe the political economy of international business; outline the effect of foreign direct investment; discuss examples of regional economic integration; demonstrate how the foreign exchange markets work; identify and explain the roles of the international monetary system and global capital markets; show various strategies and organizational structures in international businesses; identify and choose the appropriate entry strategy and necessary strategic alliances given a fact set; lay out the details and differences between exporting, importing, and countertrade; prove how global production, outsourcing, and logistics affect the international marketplace; explain how cultural and national differences affect global marketing and R & D; and account for international business, using various countries as stakeholders.
Instruction: This course is an introduction to International Business and will explore the pros and cons of economic theories, government policies, business strategies, and organizational structures in the global business world. Emphasis is on differences in economies; differing ethical issues facing today's executives; and the substantial role that politics play in international commerce. Major topics covered in the course are: Globalization; Political Economy; Economic Development; Cultural Differences; Ethics in International Business; International Trade Theory; Political Economy of International Trade; Foreign Direct Investment; Regional Economic Integration; Foreign Exchange Market; International Monetary System; Global Capital Markets; Strategy and Organization of International Business; and Entry Strategy and Strategic Alliances. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in International Business or Business (1/13).

Macroeconomics (ECO-102)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: January 2007 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss major macroeconomic issues such as economic growth, unemployment, and inflation; define and measure GDP and conduct international comparisons of economic growth; calculate unemployment and explain changes over the business cycle; construct the consumer price index (CPI) and explain its relation to inflation; identify components of the aggregate supply and demand and discuss effects of their fluctuations on the macroeconomic equilibrium; explain the Classical Model including features of the general economy at full employment; identify and discuss causes and measurement of economic growth; examine the role of money and banking institutions and the role of the Federal Reserve in controlling money supply; explain causes of inflation (demand-pull and cost-push theories and their effects on inflation); use a Phillips curve to explain the relation between inflation and unemployment in the short and long run; use Fiscal Policy doctrine to explain the federal budget and the effects of the income tax on markets and governmental budgets; use Fiscal Polity to discuss the effects of tax on savings and investments that the Federal Government uses to stabilize the price leave; and challenge and defend the credibility of monetary policy, the McCallum Rule and the Taylor Rule.
Instruction: This introductory course is for students with no prior background in Economics, yet have a working knowledge of High School Algebra. Instructional approach is mostly non-quantitative with some emphasis on graphic analysis. Students learn basic macroeconomic concepts on the aggregate supply and demand of outputs in the general economy, economic growth and unemployment, and the role of money and banking institutions in affecting the economy's price level and inflation. Students also study various fiscal and monetary policies used by the government to stabilize economic fluctuations. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Macroeconomics or Business (1/13).

Microeconomics (ECO-101)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: January 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define opportunity cost, scarcity, choice, and various economic systems; demonstrate Supply and Demand curves, identify/calculate market equilibrium and demonstrate effects of changes in demand and supply on market equilibrium; delineate the concept of elasticity, including price elasticity of demand, cross-elasticity of demand, income elasticity of demand, and elasticity of supply; express efficiency as a trade off between marginal benefit and marginal cost; identify consumer surplus and producer surplus on a graph and explain efficiency subsidies; outline inputs to the labor market including minimum wage, taxes, and subsidies; discuss and show the interplay between consumption choices, marginal utility theory, and the maximization of utility subject to a budget constraint; explain the firm and its economic problem (profit maximization, types of business organization, market sources in the U.S. economy); relate a firm's technology and cost functions, short run versus long run, and economies of scale; characterize perfect competition, as well as firm's decisions in perfect competition, equilibrium and efficiency under perfect competition; define monopoly including price setting strategies, equilibrium and efficiency under a monopoly; compare and contrast monopolistic completion and monopoly; ascertain a market as an oligopoly including identification of characteristics of this market structure and give examples; discuss effects of government regulation of the market, the economic theory of regulation; and the antitrust laws; categorize externalities and their effect on markets and prices and provide examples of positive and negative externalities and offer solutions in dealing with them; and classify public goods and explain the free-rider problem, common resources, and the public choice.
Instruction: This introductory course is for students with no prior background in Microeconomics, yet have a working knowledge of High School Algebra. Instructional approach is mostly non-quantitative on the demand and supply of goods, the economic behaviors of households and firms and their interactions, and market structures. Students will also study situations where a competitive market fails to function efficiently and possible strategies and solutions and will acquire basic analytical tools useful for a variety of economic problems in their daily lives. Major topics covered in the course are: Economics; Demand and Supply; Elasticity; Efficiency and Equity; Government Actions in Markets; Organizing Production; Output and Costs; Perfect Competition; Monopoly; Monopolistic Competition; Oligopoly; Externalities; Public Goods and Resources. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Microeconomics or Business (1/13).

Principles of Accounting (ACC-101)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: March 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain the characteristics of an account; apply the basic framework for recording transactions; distinguish between accrual and cash basis accounting; explain how the matching concept relates to accrual basis accounting; describe the basic principles of accounting systems; apply alternative methods of inventory valuation; define plant assets and describe the accounting for their cost; compute depreciation on related fixed assets; apply key financial accounting ratios used to describe characteristics of financial reports; describe and apply basic financial accounting concepts and principles; analyze financial statements; and utilize ratio analysis in the decision making process.
Instruction: Students will be introduced to the field of financial accounting, focusing on learning Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) which teach students how to record and present financial information in a meaningful way. Additionally, students learn how to properly record a business transaction and prepare a financial statement according to GAAP. Students will also study the following topics: worksheets, adjusting and closing entries, special purpose journals, posting process, accounting for merchandising businesses, importance of internal controls and ethics, proper accounting for short-term investments, notes and accounts receivable, various inventory costing methods, and proper handling of long-term assets. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Accounting or Business (1/13).

Principles of Finance (FIN-101)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: January 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify key financial issues facing a manager when making financial and investment decisions; explain the time value of money and the concept of discounting; use financial statements and identify cash flow and taxes; evaluate a company's performance based on their financial statements; discuss the role of financial markets and institutions on company policy; determine interest rates and explain the role of interest rates in financial markets; calculate the price and value of bonds and stocks; demonstrate how the relationship between risk and rates of return effect prices; compute cost of capital in financial analysis; discuss basics of capital budgeting and their bearing on investment decisions in the long term; analyze cash flows and risk; determine optimal allocation of resources in various types of financial assets (weighing capital structure and leverage); understand dividend policy and know when and why distributions are made; and use working capital, financial planning and forecasting to guide multinational financial management.
Instruction: This introductory course in Finance is for students who have no prior background in Economics or Finance. The instructional approach used will be mostly non-quantitative with some arithmetic calculations used in case examples to strengthen students' understanding. Students will learn the basic concepts and tools used in Finance that will provide them with a better understanding of how firms make decisions regarding financial management issues. Additional topics include: pricing of financial assets and management of financial capital in the short and long term. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments; class participation; and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division associate/baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Finance or Business (1/13).

Principles of Management (MAN-101)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: January 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: outline the organizational management structures typical for most organizations; assist in planning and strategic management of organizations; propose methods by which organizational decisions can be made in a wide variety of circumstances; define and explain the concept of entrepreneurship and specific problems that arise in the course of new venture management; describe problems that typically arise during the processes of organizational change and innovation; identify and help solve issues that arise in managing human resources and the behavior of individuals within an organization; propose ideas to help motivate employees to improve their performance; explain the importance of leadership and influence processes to the performance of organizations; outline the importance of communication in organizations and steps that could be taken to improve communication; and prescribe steps that may be implemented to improve management of groups and teams, the control process and operations, quality and productivity.
Instruction: This introductory course in Management is for students who have no prior background in Economics or Finance. The instructional approach used will be mostly non-quantitative with some arithmetic calculations used in case examples to strengthen students' understanding. Students will learn basic concepts and tools used in Management that will help them understand how firms make decisions regarding financial management issues. Additional topics covered are: pricing of financial assets and management of financial capital in the short and long term. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management or Business (1/13).

Principles of Marketing (MAR-101)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: January 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the importance of managing profitable customer relationships; identify important steps in partnering to build customer relationships; assist in managing marketing relationships; read and interpret trends in consumer and business buying behavior from given statistics; define segmentation, targeting and positioning and explain their importance in the marketing field; assist in the construction of product, services and branding strategies; determine relevant factors that must be considered during new product development; identify pricing considerations and strategies crucial to marketing products; assist in determining effective marketing channels when launching a given product under a given scenario; help manage advertising, sales promotion, and public relations; describe key features and differences that exist in marketing over the internet and marketing through other media; conduct marketing in a manner that accounts for social responsibility and marketing ethics.
Instruction:This introductory course examines fundamental principles, problems and practices of marketing.The goal is to provide students with a foundation of marketing principles including product, price, placement, and promotion. Students also examine the functions of marketing as they relate to the production and distribution of goods and services that are ultimately purchased by the consumer.  Major topics covered in this course are: Creating and Capturing Customer Value; Partnering to Build Customer Relationships; Analyzing the Marketing Environment; Managing Marketing Information to gain customer insights; Understanding Consumer and Business Buyer Behavior; Creating Value for target customers; Product, Services, and Brands; Developing new products and managing the product life cycle; Pricing; Retailing and Wholesaling; Advertising and Public Relations; Personal Selling and Sales Promotion; Building Direct Customer Relationships. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Marketing or Business (1/13).

GOVERNMENT/HISTORY

American Government (GOV-201-1212)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: November 2010 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe how American democracy functions; detail the history and debates surrounding the Constitution; understand the genesis of the protection of civil liberties and civil rights; explain how mass media impact the political process; cite examples and explanations of how Americans participate in politics; identify the roles and operations of political parties; discuss the Electoral College and its criticisms; define special interest groups and lobbies and how they work; assess the effects of the interplay between the President and Congress with respect to how laws are enacted; explicate the role of the Federal Judicial System; define the challenges for policymaking in the 21st century; join the debate over healthcare as public policy; and discuss and classify the latest threads to national security.
Instruction: This introductory course in American Government provides a basic understanding of the American political process. The primary focus is on the individuals, groups, and institutions that form and inform the federal government and how laws have evolved. Students learn how government functions at the national, state, and local levels and come to understand the workings of participatory democracy. Students are encouraged to become active contributors to the political system by learning how government impacts their lives and how they can make a difference in the lives of others. Major topics covered in the course are: The United States Constitution; Federal Judicial System; Lobbying and Special Interest Groups; and the roles and relationships among the President, Congress, and court systems. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category,  3 semester hours in American Government (1/13).

American History I: Discovery to Reconstruction (HIS-201-1207)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: July 2010 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: detail the process, nature, and motivation behind European exploration and colonization of America; explain the impact and legacy of slavery; identify the context, root causes, and consequences of the American Revolution; describe the campaign for and prelude leading to the writing and passage of the Constitution; discuss the effects of American policies on Native Americans and the long-term implications thereof; trace the series of events that caused Westward expansion; explicate the speed, nature, costs, benefits, and public policy dilemmas of the building of the United States economy and the United States Industrial Revolution; precis the reasons for The Civil War and how it scarred the nation; and explain the prominent historical viewpoints regarding Reconstruction and explain its failure.
Instruction: This introductory course surveys American History from the colonial period through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Students will learn about migration from Europe and Africa and the formation of colonies, the impact of settlement on Native Americans and the development of new social and political ideas as the country was created. Major topics covered in the course are:European exploration and colonization of America; slavery; American Revolution; United States Constitution; Westward Expansion; United States Industrial Revolution; and the Civil War. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in American History (1/13).

American History II: Westward Expansion to Post-Vietnam (HIS-202-1209)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: September 2010 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the settlement of the West after The Civil War; explain the near destruction of Native American tribes; trace the growth of big business and the industrial age along with its implications for Americans of different backgrounds; cite reasons for relentless process of urbanization and the rise of the middle class; assess the root causes of demands for various reforms and popular movements; detail the dilemmas facing the United States in each world war and discuss United States involvement therein; understand the Great Depression and its effects on the institution of government in the United States; explicate the rise of segregation and the Civil Rights movement; and discuss the effects of the Vietnam War and its aftermath.
Instruction: This course is a continuation of American History I, convening the period from Reconstruction through the end of the twentieth century. Students will study the westward expansion, social movements that brought tremendous change to U.S. laws and government, and the causes and consequences of the most deadly wars of the last century. Major topics covered in the course are: The Civil War; United States Industrial Age; Urbanization; Great Depression; Segregation; and The Vietnam War. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in American History (1/13).

Comparative Politics (POL-201-1208)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: August 2010 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe political systems and states; detail the process of fostering economic development; understand why people compare political systems; pinpoint the structures and functions of political systems; explicate why and how culture matters to political processes; identify trends shaping contemporary political cultures; explain how citizens participate in sociopolitical affairs in different societies; discuss the development of interest groups, describing their historical performances; define authoritarian party systems and their power structures; assess the prospects and challenges facing democracies and authoritarianism; trace the geographic distribution of government power; explain the process of community building; and present the common outcomes of international interactions and their generalities.
Instruction: This course provides students with a broad survey of important issues in the study of comparative politics and allows them to gain understanding of world politics and political systems and to compare issues and structures on a global level. Students will conduct in-depth studies of individual countries and examine how local issues have a worldwide impact. Each country study applies a theoretical framework to explore broad issues like why some countries modernize more quickly or why some are more democratic. Additionally, students explore the impact of politics on individual, group, national, and global levels. Throughout the semester, students will study political institutions and processes and think critically about the consequences of public policies. Major topics covered in the course are: Political systems; Special Interest Groups; Authoritarian Party Systems; Community Building; and International Interactions. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Politics.

LAW

Administrative Law (PLG-302)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: November 2009 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: perform basic administrative law research on the Federal and State levels, including agency directories and LEXIS; discuss how administrative bodies work; explain the scope and limitations of agency investigations; describe how administrative rule making is conducted; provide an overview of Administrative Procedures Act; and explain the role of the Freedom of Information Act in agency matters.
Instruction: This course presents the constitutional, legal, and administrative principles that regulate the activities of administrative agencies, on both the Federal and State levels. Students will learn formal and informal advocacy techniques, including the role of the paralegal in such proceedings. Substantive topics include: administrative delegation of power; rule making; agency discretionary powers; remedies; and judicial review. Procedural topics include: agency operation; adjudication; hearing preparation; and administrative and judicial appeals. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Administrative Law or Business Law (1/13).

Advanced Civil Litigation (PLG-402)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: November 2009 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe the court systems as they exist on the federal level and in most states; determine which paralegal tasks should be billed as "legal work" to clients; prepare for and conduct an initial client interview in a civil litigation process; determine which types of evidence will be admissible at trial and properly preserve that evidence; help plan an investigation into an incident relevant to civil litigation; draft pleadings (i.e., complaint and answer) that are filed at the outset of a civil case; file a complaint and arrange to have it properly served on the defendant; determine the manner in which to obtain a default judgment in the student's jurisdiction; draft a motion for relief from a court during a civil litigation proceeding; help assemble a discovery plan for investigating relevant information using appropriate discovery devices; draft interrogatories and requests for production and notices of deposition; create digests of depositions and other discovery responses and extract relevant information; describe the main methods of alternative dispute resolution; assist with jury investigation and selection; help attorneys throughout the trial process by keeping a trial notebook, tending to witness needs, etc; prepare a judgment, bill of costs, and other important post-trial documents; and assist with the preparation of appellate briefs, including the preparation of a table of authorities, statement of issue, etc.
Instruction: This course is designed specifically to prepare a student to handle all aspects of a civil case and examines the trial process from start to finish and looks at the paralegal's role and the rules that the paralegal must follow to fulfill that role. Additionally, the course explores all of the steps in a civil case, commencing with the initial client interview and following the civil litigation process through the initial investigation, drafting, and filing of the complaint, the discovery process, trial preparation, and assistance during the trial. The course concludes with an examination of the paralegal's role in the appeals process. Special emphasis is placed on pleadings and motions and preparing and filing discovery requests and responses. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Civil Litigation or Business Law (1/13).

Advanced Legal Analysis and Writing (PLG-401)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: August 2009 - Present.
Objectives Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: appropriately cite any authority, including cases, statutes, law review articles, secondary authorities, etc.; appropriately differentiate between various types of legal writing, including intra-office memorandum, legal brief, and others; properly organize, using the I-R-A-C method in organizing a legal essay or memorandum; write in a clear, concise, and legalistic manner; distinguish between mandatory and persuasive authority and determine how much weight to give each in varying situations; identify and apply key facts and rules in cases and statutes; separate, identify, and draft varying components of a legal brief, including the table of contents, table of authorities, question presented, argument, and conclusion; and appropriately revise and edit legal writings to avoid excessive legalese, verbose, or incomprehensible language and other legal writing errors.
Instruction: This is an advanced course that seeks to refine students' ability to write in a formal, legal manner. Additionally, students receive training in drafting legal memoranda and briefs and examine different types of legal memoranda and writings that exist. Instruction will focus on forms of legal writing and trains students in the art of adapting their writing to the given situation. The course also focuses on developing the ability to apply legal research to the creation of the written legal document. Students' familiarity with legal research through Lexis (or other means) and basic knowledge of the United States court system and differences between mandatory and persuasive authority are presumed. Students are expected to research, draft, and submit an appellate brief based on an assigned fact pattern and fictitious procedural history. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam. Prerequisite: Legal Research, Writing, and Civil Litigation (PLG-108).
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Legal Analysis and Writing or Business Law (1/13).


Alternative Dispute Resolution (PLG-111)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: March 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze the advantages and disadvantages of negotiation in a particular situation vis-a-vis taking the dispute to a court of law; assist in strategically determining a client's negotiation position in terms of the strengths and weaknesses of the case; explain how a person can generally avoid dangers which arise during negotiation; analyze ethical issues that may arise in negotiation; explain the role of a mediator; analyze the meaning and effect of mediation agreements and how they affect the parties' future rights; explain advantages and disadvantages of arbitration and assist in making the determination of whether it is an appropriate choice for a particular case; research and apply state and federal laws that govern arbitration; take necessary steps to initiate an arbitration proceeding; and explain form and functions of high-low arbitration and how it operates differently from traditional arbitration.
Instruction:This course provides students with a working knowledge of the basic theories underlying negotiation, arbitration, and mediation. Students will learn the important distinguishing characteristics of each of these "alternative" approaches to resolving disputes and will also learn how to address the ethical and legal issues which may arise in pursuit of these remedies. In addition to covering current theory on these topics, much of the course will be dedicated to hypothetical scenarios and court cases concerning arbitration. Another portion of the course will center on the contracts involved in mediation. Thus, students will complete this class familiar with the general workings of these processes both from a theoretical and a practical perspective.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Alternative Dispute Resolution or Business Law (1/13).

Business Law and Bankruptcy (PLG-105)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: September 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe various documents that must be filed with government agencies in order to create various types of businesses; explain characteristics of various business formations, specifically as they relate to tax and liability issues; outline the formation of a corporation including the certificate of incorporation and corporate bylaws; determine which form of business is most appropriate in a particular situation; list various remedies available to shareholders in claims of mismanagement against key personnel of the corporation; outline the basics of mergers, acquisitions, and hostile takeovers; outline procedures through which mergers and hostile takeovers are accomplished and apply some of the laws surrounding those events to hypothetical situations; define functioning of major stock exchanges such as the New York Stock Exchange and NASDAQ; explain various types of bankruptcy protection available under federal law; identify the most appropriate type of bankruptcy protection to seek, given an individual's financial situation; compare and contrast various types of bankruptcy filings, including liquidation bankruptcy under Chapter 7 of the Bankruptcy Code and reorganization under Chapters 11 and 13; outline the bankruptcy process including various timetables involved; and define and apply the rule of creditors and determine which debts will most likely have priority over others.
Instruction: This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the principles of the most significant laws pertaining to business organizations. The Business Organization Law component of the course focuses on individual characteristics of various business organizations, including publicly held and closely held corporations, general partnerships, sole proprietorships, limited liability partnerships and limited liability corporations. These various forms of business will be compared and contrasted to determine the advantages and disadvantages of creating and maintaining each form. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit recommendation:In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours or Business Law or Bankruptcy (1/13).

Constitutional Law and Criminal Procedure (PLG-110)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: December 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: articulate roles of the federal, state, and local governments; explain the concept of separation of powers; determine whether a particular state or federal law is at risk of being found unconstitutional; describe due process and equal protection clauses of the U. S. Constitution and the impact on civil rights; outline standards that courts use in determining whether the government may make classifications that treat people differently from one another; define when a law can deprive people of certain freedoms; research case law involving claims of government deprivation of civil rights; outline freedoms protected by the First Amendment, such as speech, assembly, and religion; define and apply rights and responsibilities of police officers under the Fourth and Fourteenth Amendments regarding search and seizure and identify which searches that are regulated by the Fourth Amendment and police actions that are not considered searches and are thus not restricted by the Amendment; analyze whether findings in an illegal search will be admissible in a particular case based on governing case law; outline the process by which a criminal suspect is arrested, held, interrogated, and eventually tried and describe protections afforded a criminal suspect in police custody; decide whether a suspect when properly "Mirandized"' and outline the rights of a criminal suspect through the trial and sentencing process.
Instruction: This course provides students with a general understanding of the major issues in Constitutional Law, including the separation of powers between the Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Branches of the Federal Government; federalism and states' rights; concept of interstate commerce; freedom of speech (The First Amendment); substantive and procedural due process; equal protection clause; and various areas of discrimination. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Constitutional Law or Criminal Procedures (1/13).

Contracts (PLG-102)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: April 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: properly research various sources of contract law including common law, case law, general obligation statutes and the Uniform Commercial Code (U.C.C.); describe the process in which a contract can be formed by "mutual assent"; differentiate between an offer and a mere expression of interest or invitation to negotiate; describe rules of revocation by actions or expressions and apply those rules to fact patterns; list actions that constitute acceptance of an offer; apply more complex aspects of the rule of consideration including the rules governing partial payment checks and promises to pay rewards; define and apply rules regarding defenses against the enforcement of a contract; recognize cases in which a contract can be voided due to grounds such as mistake, duress, unconscionably, statute of frauds, etc. and determine whether any such defense is applicable in a particular case; decide if a contract has been breached in a particular fact pattern; apply "substantial performance" rule to breach of contract scenarios and the related "perfect tender" rule of the U.C.C. in the sale of goods; apply rules for contract remedies (expectation, reliance and restitution damages) to a particular fact pattern and predict kind of remedy a court will be most likely to order in that case; outline the type of remedy a court will likely order in a specific case; and outline the necessary conditions before a court will order equitable remedies such as specific performance.
Instruction: This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the common law of contracts from the formation of a contract through its termination including several ways in which the contract can be entered: consideration, offer, and acceptance; illusory contracts;oral contracts, the statute of frauds, accord, and satisfaction, enforcement, damages for breach of contract, and the several defenses available to a party who rescinds on a contract. Students also study the Uniform Commercial Code and the laws governing the sale of goods. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business Law or Contracts (1/13).

Criminal Law (PLG-103)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: May 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: outline necessary elements for the prosecution of any crime; determine whether a crime has been committed based on a fact pattern and if true, which crime has been committed; describe basic elements of various common law crimes; research criminal codes and apply elements of a crime in various state or federal jurisdictions; prepare a memorandum with regard to a question of criminal law in a hypothetical fact pattern; describe and apply various defenses that are available under the criminal laws of different jurisdictions; and apply federal and/or state sentencing guidelines to convictions where applicable.
Instruction: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of criminal law and outlines definitions and elements of common law crimes against persons, property and various legal defenses available to criminal defendants. Also discussed are certain topics in criminal procedure that highlight constitutional safeguards and procedures involved from arrest through trial. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Law (1/13).

Domestic Relations (PLG-107)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: February 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze a pre-nuptial agreement with standard clauses and describe the basis upon which the agreement can be challenged; outline marriage requirements in most states; determine whether a valid marriage exists in a particular hypothetical scenario; describe rules of commencement and dissolution of parental rights; define and apply rules of custody of biological children, adoption, and the termination of parental rights; apply important "best interest of the child" standard; outline prevalent grounds for divorce under the law of most jurisdictions as they relate to "fault" and "no-fault" grounds; and apply rules of marital property upon divorce and the rules regarding child support.
Instruction: This course surveys various issues pertaining to family law including the marital relationship, divorce, alimony, and other forms of support that can result from divorces, equitable distribution of property, and child custody. Instruction also focuses on: recent decisions and legislation that have profoundly impacted relatively modern issues and trends such as illegitimacy and status, palimony, rights of unmarried parents, surrogate parents, and no-fault divorce. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Domestic Relations or Family Law (1/13).

Drafting Contracts and Contract Provisions (PLG-403)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: January 2009 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the importance of a contractual agreement and what the agreement means; outline and apply the seven contractual concepts; apply and explain to clients and colleagues the risk allocation involved in entering into contractual agreements; draft contracts and contract provisions in plain English and convert terms written in "legalese" into plain English; explain the difference between contractual terms of art and apply them to various circumstances in which they should be used; draft standard contractual provisions clearly and without ambiguities; explain the organization and chronology of a contract; review a contract that has already been drafted and identify areas that need to be added to, removed, corrected, etc; and avoid or overcome ethical dilemmas in contract drafting.
Instruction: This course focuses on the "building block" components that comprise a contract and how each component is drafted. Students will get a "behind the scenes" look at conversations and negotiations that occur prior to getting to the drafting stage and what happens during and after the drafting stage. Students learn how to draft in simple terms (simplify complex sentences, agreements, and statutes into plain English) for an easy-to-read contract. A review of basic grammar principles is also included. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Contract Law or Business Law (1/13).

Employment Law (PLG-202)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: January 2010 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify when an employment relationship exists for a variety of legal purposes; determine types of questions that should and should not be asked of employees during the interview process; identify compensation policies and issues that may cause a company client legal trouble if left un addressed; define and apply certain key rules set forth under the Fair Labor Standards Act; determine which employee benefits must and should be granted to employees; suggest proper business procedures and standards for evaluating employees' job performance as they may lead to termination; decide whether a proposed discharge can be used by an employee in a complaint against an employer; determine and apply key anti-discrimination rules as they relate to employment on the basis of race, national origin, gender, religion, age, and disability; apply the most important rules of the Family Medical Leave Act; effectively balance the employees' rights to privacy against the employers' right to maintain a safe and effective work environment; apply certain key immigration concerns in hiring and maintaining a work force; and properly determine types of safety issues that could cause employers legal problems under federal laws including OSHA.
Instruction: This course examines the relevant agency principles that apply to the employer-employee relationship and looks at the relationship itself, from the interviewing process through termination and the responsibilities owed by the employer and employee to each other. Instruction also focuses on distinction between an employee and an independent contractor; rules governing employment discrimination including ones based on gender, race, health, etc.; and the "at will" employment doctrine, its applications and exceptions. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Employment Law or Labor Law (1/13).

Environmental Law (PLG-203)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: October 2010 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify sources and legal foundations of environmental law; explain the litigation process including the concept of standing; outline the history of the development of environmental law and the concept of environmental justice; apply management principles to environmental law; explain the relationship of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to environmental law; compare and contrast National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) with other environmental laws; define the nature of waters covered by the Clean Water Act (CWA) and explain the procedures for the CWA permit system; describe the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES); identify technology-based standards applicable under federal environmental law; outline and research major provisions of the Oil Pollution Act (OPA) and the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA); research and describe the technological standards applicable to the Clean Air Act (CAA) and the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Permit Program and an Operating Permit Program; list four characteristics of hazardous waste; outline key elements of the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA) inventory and chemical identity; summarize the history of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and how it differs from other federal environmental acts, including substances covered by FIFRA; compare and contrast the focus of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and other environmental acts; defend the importance of the emergency planning component of EPCRA; illustrate the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting requirements; and list types of laws that are considered natural resource laws.
Instruction: This course introduces students to the study of environmental law with emphasis on the role of the paralegal and surveys major environmental acts in the United States, such as the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and other legislation. Also presented is an overview of the treatment of issues concerning the environment from a legal perspective. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Environmental Law (1/13).

Federal Income Taxation (PLG-201)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: January 2010 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: list types of income that are subject to federal income taxation and those that are exempt; analyze when and to what extent unearned income (prizes, gifts, windfalls, etc.) are subject to income taxation; recognize the types of tax deferrals that might be available and advantageous to a particular client and discuss pros and cons of various forms of tax deferral; differentiate between cash method and accrual method in accounting and discuss tax ramifications of both; explain differences between various types of retirement accounts and tax features of each; outline types of individual personal income tax deductions, business income tax deductions and deductions for individuals running the business; analyze how and to what extent a mixed personal and business expense may be eligible for an income tax deduction; research and find the income tax rates for trusts and analyze various options for reducing a trust's income tax burden; compare and contrast grantor and non-grantor trusts and the importance of each; outline the method of determining long and short-term capital gains tax liability; assist in the preparation of Form 1040-Individual Income Tax Return as well as other important tax forms such Form 1041 (Fiduciary Income Tax Return) and extensions and administrative forms.
Instruction: This course focuses on individual taxpayers and also looks at various other types of taxpayers such as trusts, estates, partnerships, and corporations. Other topics covered in the course are: imposed income taxes; taxation of ordinary income; interest, corporate dividends and capital gains; personal and business deductions and advantages of both; income tax rules and the effects on planning certain types of businesses, ventures, and estate planning techniques; practical aspects of income tax law and preparation of various types of income tax returns. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Income Tax Law (1/13).

Immigration Law (PLG-204)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: November 2009 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define common vocabulary terms related to immigration law; outline various non-immigrant visa categories and requirements (Visa Alphabet); complete a Family Based Petition and a Worker Based Petition; describe how individuals gain entry into the United States; discuss elements of deportation and removal requirements; outline worker preference categories for certain visas; explain asylum and the requirements; outline the appeal process for denied applications and petitions; and explain the naturalization process and the related requirements.
Instruction: This course teaches students the basics of immigration law in the United States, including the process by which individuals gain lawful entry into the country and the converse process of deportation and removal proceedings. Students will learn about the various non-immigrant visa categories and requirements as well as the steps to naturalization. Other topics include:family based petitions; worker based petitions and requests for asylum; hearings relevant to Immigration Law and the appeals process for those denied entry or who are subject to deportation. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Immigration Law (1/13).

Laws of Evidence (PLG-301)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: January 2009 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: defend the policy rationale for various rules of evidence; identify issues of evidence that are decided by a judge and which are decided by a jury; outline the burdens of proof that apply to various issues regarding types of trials, including criminal and civil trials and evidentiary hearings; explain relevant evidence rule and the "catch all" exception under Federal Rule 403; analyze whether and to what extent character evidence and prior acts can be admissible in a courtroom to prove action in conformity with those characteristics; define the "original documents" rule and explain when and under which circumstances copies of documents can be admissible; outline the rules regarding the extent to which impeachment of witnesses is allowed on cross-examination; outline the role of an "expert" witness and additional latitude an expert witness gets in terms of relevant testimony; explain hearsay rule, how it's used and apply the numerous exceptions to the hearsay rule as related to fact patterns; and list evidentiary privileges that are allowed under federal and state law.
Instruction: This course presents a survey of the most relevant and important rules of evidence and focuses on the Federal Rules of Evidence but will also note comparative state laws when they differ from federal rules. Other topics covered are areas of evidence law including relevancy, character evidence, impeachment of witnesses, hearsay, and original document rule. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Laws of Evidence (1/13).

Legal Document Preparation (PLG-404)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: April 2009 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: draft a basic sales or services contract from a template with proper adjustments according to facts and goals of the client; draft and review real property contracts, analyzing and citing key provisions to meet the goals of the client; prepare different types of real property deeds with a variety of provisions; prepare Articles of Incorporation for a for-profit or non-profit corporation and be able to file documentation with the appropriate state agency; review corporate by-laws and analyze their key provisions; draft a general or limited partnership agreement or LLC operating agreement from a template with proper adjustments according to the needs of the client; draft a valid and binding will that includes key features such as: personal representative designations, establishment of testamentary trusts, no contest clauses and self-proving affidavits; draft certain types of testamentary trusts from templates; prepare a Chapter 7, 11, or 13  bankruptcy petition based on client information; prepare civil complaints and answers, civil motions, and a variety of discovery requests, including requests for depositions, interrogatories, documents, etc; draft pre-nuptial agreements from templates; and organize an appellate brief, including the preparation of a table of authorities and general organization of the structure of the appellate brief.
Instruction: This practical course deals with the preparation of a host of legal documents and the drafting tasks assigned to paralegals across a broad spectrum of practice areas. Instruction focuses on training and completing hands-on tasks, drafting key documents relating to the fields or torts, contracts, Wills, Trusts, Domestic Relations, Litigation, Real Property and more. A variety of ancillary forms will be reviewed in order to familiarize students with key forms that need to be completed in fields he/she chooses to practice. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam. Prerequisite: Three of more of the following courses: Business Law, Contracts, Domestic Relations, Legal Research, Writing, and Civil Litigation, Real Property, Torts and Personal Injury, or Wills, Trusts, and Estates.
Credit recommendation:In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Legal Documentation Preparation (1/13).

Legal Research, Writing, and Civil Litigation (PLG-108)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: January 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: research legal issues in any jurisdiction; navigate through online law libraries (i.e., LexisNexis); cite appropriate authorities and legal sources; distinguish between "binding" and "persuasive" authority; determine valid case law using "Shepards"; assist in writing a persuasive legal memorandum; apply rules of venue in both federal and state jurisdictions; describe key elements of various civil pleadings (i.e., complaints, answers, etc.); define various discovery mechanisms and appropriate usage; apply the rules regarding admissibility of information obtained through the discovery process in a court of law; list basic rules of trial procedure and rules of evidence; determine appropriate appellate court to which a verdict can be appealed; outline standards for review that appellate courts use in various situations; describe the requirements for certification in a class action suit; and determine whether a class action is appropriate in various hypothetical situations.
Instruction: This course is among the most important that a paralegal student can complete because it's the area of litigation that attorneys rely most heavily on paralegals.The course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the major aspects of civil litigation, from both the plaintiff's and defendant's perspectives and focuses on a variety of subjects aimed at teaching students how to manage a case from beginning to end. The course offers an intensive but simplified introduction to the U.S. legal systems and methodologies, basic principles of stare decisis and precedent, the nature of legal education, and sources of law. Topics include: the judicial structure, including both federal and state; statutes, regulations, common law and constitutional law; synthesizing sources of law; the judicial process and the doctrine of stare decicis; overruling precedent, holding, rationale, and dictum. A key component to the paralegal's role in civil litigation is drafting documents so instruction focuses on training students to conduct competent legal research and develop abilities in drafting legal documents. Students also learn to identify and utilize a variety of research tools, including online collection provided by LexisNexis as well as traditional print-based methods of legal research. Additionally, students will use various types of reference books, proper case citation, cite checking, and the proper method of case reporting, Shepardizing, methods of compiling legislative histories, and administrative legal research. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Legal Research, Writing, and Civil Litigation (1/13).

Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights (PLG-112)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:  January 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: outline differences in copyrights, patents, and trademarks; explain basic requirements for protection and apply those standards in determining whether a particular bit of intellectual property is eligible for protection; explain the categories of works that are protected; determine the types of rights given to a copyright, patent, or trademark holder; research statutory and case law in the intellectual property field; distinguish between types of authority relevant to intellectual property law; determine the duration of intellectual property interests based on applicable statutory law; identify various types of infringement; determine whether defenses to infringement are available based on a particular fact pattern; and outline available remedies that may be available regarding a particular infringement case.
Instruction: This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the various types of intellectual property, including patents, trademarks, and copyrights and covers basic requirements for protecting each type of intangible; highlights the sources of authority that govern intellectual property law; explains types of available rights; introduces what constitutes infringement; discusses defenses available for infringement and list types of remedies used to compensate an owner for infringement. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights (1/13).

Professional Responsibility and Legal Ethics (PLG-109)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: January 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: research ethical rules by utilizing the American Bar Association's "Model Rules of Professional Conduct" and access the rules of professional conduct applicable in any jurisdiction throughout the country; describe the role of the paralegal vis-a-vis the attorney that he/she is working under; apply the distinction between "practicing law" and performing tasks permitted to a paralegal in order to avoid "unauthorized practice of law"; outline the process through which a paralegal determines what client information is classified as confidential; describe when, to whom, and in what matter confidential client information may be disclosed; determine the point at which an attorney-client relationship has been formed; list duties of zeal and loyalty that legal professionals owe to their clients; describe various factors that constitute a "conflict of interest"; apply the ethical rules regarding the "business of law" (i.e., promotion and advertising); assess whether a fee charged by a law firm is reasonable or unethical overcharge; and outline the rules governing proper communication with the presiding judge.
Instruction:This course covers the basic principles governing the ethical practice of law for both lawyers and paralegals and provides students with necessary tools for identifying and resolving ethical problems and provides practical tips to implement in everyday practice. Major topics covered in the course are: regulation of attorney and paralegal conduct; confidentiality; unauthorized practice of law;conflicts of interest; handling of client funds; advertising; billing; fee splitting;disciplinary procedures and malpractice. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Ethics or Business Law  (1/13).

Public Communications Law (PLG-303)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: March 2010 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the administrative agencies involved in regulating the media and describe roles in doing so; explain how the First Amendment protects the media and allows them the right to communicate news and ideas to the public; outline the methods of prior restraint employed by the government to stifle speech by the media and the extent to which these are allowed; explain the elements of defamation and extent to which the media is protected from defamation lawsuits by the First Amendment; describe various actions that constitute invasion of privacy, especially as it relates to the media broadcasting information about people or companies; apply copyright laws to determine whether a media's usage of copyrighted material is an infringement or is protected under the fair use rule; apply trademark laws to determine whether a media's usage of a company's trademark is an infringement of the owner's rights; explain the extent to which political speech is protected and the limitations that the government can subject free speech to protect the integrity of elections; discuss how the First Amendment protects commercial advertising; research and apply false and deceptive advertising rules that exist under federal law; determine whether a communication is obscene and thus not protected by the First Amendment; explain the extent and manner in which the broadcast of "indecent" material is limited under federal law; outline the steps that judges may take against the media to limit their ability to poison the jury pool in preparation for a trial; identify and discuss protections that are given to journalists under federal and state law that allow them to keep their sources confidential; decide what government information can and cannot be obtained under the Freedom of Information Act and state equivalents; and seek information under the Freedom of Information Act.
Instruction: This course explores the role of the law in both protecting and limiting the media and examines the First Amendment freedoms of speech and the press and how that impacts the government's ability to regulate the media. Some key concepts such as prior restraint, obscenity, false advertising, and election rules are examined. Students also discuss federal regulation of the media and private remedies that people may have against the media regarding issues such as defamation and copyright infringement. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Public Communications Law (1/13).

Real Property (PLG-104)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: January 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the "estate system" and explain ways it is relevant in determining ownership of property; compare and contrast co-tenancy, joint tenancy, tenancy in common or by the entirety and community property; discuss rights and responsibilities of a landlord and tenant; outline grounds for eviction of a tenant; determine whether a wrongful eviction or other wrongs against a tenant have been committed; outline key points in a real estate sales contract and a deed for real property and general procedures of a real estate closing; apply rules of easements (i.e., rights of owners and non-owners as to property usage to a particular fact pattern); define and apply rules of eminent domain, water rights, etc.; apply rules governing local zoning laws and determine whether a particular client's situation is one in which he/she is likely to receive a sought variance based on the general standards under which local zoning boards operate; and determine when zoning boards' decisions can be appealed to state and federal courts.
Instruction: This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of the concepts and working terminology of real property law and reviews disclosure obligations and regulations affecting brokers, sales people, and owners. The course introduces students to buying, selling, leasing, and investing in real estate. Other topics examined are: general laws of land ownership and transactions, including rights and interests in land, forms of ownership and methods of title transfer; title examinations and insurance; parties to a real estate transaction; the sales agreement and contract; real estate finance, including appraisals and mortgages; the owner-broker relationship; deeds and indentures; real property descriptions; the closing and settlement process; post-settlement activities; and the process of real estate transaction and necessary documentation. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Real Property Law (1/13).

Torts and Personal Injury (PLG-101)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: January 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: outline the rules of intentional torts and apply them to specific fact patterns; discuss rules regarding defenses to allegations of such torts and apply them to specific fact patterns; draft a memorandum to a court or supervising attorney, applying the elements of a cause of action to a real life scenario; research the elements of any cause of action under state or federal law, using statutory and/or case law; apply the rules regarding special duties owed, including those by land owners, common carriers, innkeepers, etc. to hypothetical fact patterns; determine extent of liability for a specific negligent act; outline appropriate defenses such as contributory negligence and assumption of risk; apply the rules of strict and product liability and product liability cases, including failure to warn, mis-design, and mis-manufacture; evaluate whether a defamation action can be successfully brought in a hypothetical fact pattern; and apply the elements for causes of action in fraud, malicious prosecution, invasion of privacy, and interferences with commerce to hypothetical fact patterns.
Instruction: This course provides students with a general understanding of the laws dealing with civil wrongs and the remedies for those wrongs, including intentional torts, negligence, liability of principals for the actions of their agents, strict liability, products liability, nuisance, defamation, invasion of privacy, and various factors that affect the right of a plaintiff to bring suit against a defendant. The course also focuses attention on the nature of personal injury litigation, its documentation and practices, assessing and evaluating claims of damages, losses, and the formalities of adjudication and/or settlement. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit recommendation:In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Torts and Personal Injury (1/13).

White Collar Crime (PLG-304)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: October 2010 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to: define white collar crime; provide examples of behavior generally characterized as white collar criminal activity; explain the effect of white collar crime on society; describe various laws enacted to deter the commission of white collar criminal activity; explain challenges associated with the prosecution, defense, and adjudication of white collar crimes; discuss the state and federal enforcement agencies and officials charged with policing and regulating white collar crime; describe the concepts of criminal and civil liability and how they relate to the area of white collar crime; outline various classes of white collar crime (i.e., occupational crime, technocrime, finance crime, etc.); and explain challenges affecting the justice system's response to white collar crime.
Instruction: This course introduces students to a variety of topics and issues in the area of white collar crime and specifically reviews the debate regarding the definition of white collar crime. Other topics covered in the course are: costs of white collar crime and corporate crime to society; use of economic and criminal sanctions to deter the misconduct of white collar criminal offenders; and possible preventive measures of white collar crimes. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in White Collar Crime (1/13).

Wills, Trusts, and Estates (PLG-106)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: January 2008 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to: identify rules of intestacy and apply them to a fact pattern; outline the basic structure of the federal and state gift and estate tax system; assist in the preparation of an estate plan for a hypothetical client; assist in the drafting of a will, including various testamentary trusts that may be appropriate for a hypothetical client's situation; draft various provisions in wills and explain their significance; determine which beneficiaries are entitled to which assets, based on reading provisions of a will; explain the purpose and effect of credit shelter trusts, qualified terminable interests in property, qualified domestic trusts, individual single beneficiary trusts, etc.; identify and apply various rule regarding will execution; assist in the preparation and filing of a probate process; assist in the drafting of a variety of trusts; explain the forms and functions of various types of trusts, both revocable and irrevocable, irrevocable life insurance trusts, etc.; outline the benefits of charitable trusts; evaluate whether a charitable trust is beneficial for a hypothetical client; outline the features of various types of charitable trusts and appropriate usage; and identify and apply basic rules that govern trust administration, including the rights and responsibilities of the trustee.
Instruction: This course familiarizes students with a practical understanding of the laws of estate planning. Students learn how the federal estate tax system works and what to consider when doing estate planning. Topics include: federal estate and gift taxation; various estate planning techniques; proper use of trusts; life insurance as an estate planning tool; gifts; charitable transfers; intra-family business and property transfers; and planning for incapacity. Students will learn appropriate procedures relevant to drafting and interpreting will and trust documents and will become familiar with the initial planning and preparation necessary for a comprehensive estate plan. Class discussion focuses on: techniques for drafting estate planning documents; estate administration; probate practice; closing of an estate; relevant gift tax laws; role of the probate courts in estate planning; and basic inheritance. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Wills, Trusts, and Estates (1/13).

MISCELLANEOUS

Ideas in Mathematics (MAT-201)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: February 2011 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: find optimal solutions using graph theory; analyze and manipulate data to demonstrate probability and statistics; identify and discuss various voting systems in terms of fairness and social choice; use game theory to navigate conflict strategies; discuss information science as it pertains to identification numbers, codes, and cryptography; and apply dynamical systems and chaos to biological populations and management of resources.
Instruction: This introductory course provides an overview of ideas in mathematics and develops various topics such as understanding problems and their applications to the real world and approaches to solving problems, including computational methods. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, practice assignments; class participation; and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in College Math.

Introduction to Sociology (SOC-201)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: November 2010 - Present.
Objectives Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: outline the history of Sociology as a field; identify the manner in which sociological research is conducted; consider ethical and social ramifications of sociological research when conducting such research; compare and contrast culture and diversity; determine the interaction between human nature and socialization and the effect the former has on the latter in a variety of contexts; characterize societal institutions on the macro and micro levels; ascertain the role of technology on society and human interaction; detail the effects of mass media on socialization; identify roles of social groups and organizations on human society and interaction; and analyze the role of deviance from societal norms on society and discuss the social control of such behavior exercised by society.
Instruction: This is an introductory course for students with no prior background in Sociology. Students are guided through the process of asking and answering important questions from a sociological perspective by exercising critical thinking, reading, and writing skills as they're exposed to sociological theories and research that can be applied to important social issues. The course teaches how individuals are organized into social groups, ranging from intimate groups to bureaucracies and how these influence individual behavior and the nature and interrelationships of basic social institutions such as family, education, religion, and the economy. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology (1/13).

Management Information Systems (MIS-201)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: May 2010 - Present.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify the organization of information systems in general and their roles of the modern organization in a web-based environment; describe how businesses generally use information systems; assist in the management of both data and knowledge in managing an organization; describe the infrastructure of the information technology system; discuss the roles of e-business and e-commerce in today's business environment; determine the extent to which wireless and mobile computing must be taken into account when managing an organization's delivery of information over the internet; explain how information systems can be acquired and applied; and manage information systems as they relate to ethical and social issues, especially those unique to the information age.
Instruction: This course is an introduction to Information Technology and its applications to the business world. Students explore issues with conducting business in a web-based environment and how to achieve a competitive advantage in a successful digital information system. Major topics covered in the course are: information technology infrastructure; wireless and mobile computing; and building and management of systems from the organizational and managerial perspective. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Computer Information Systems, Information Sciences, or Business Management (1/13). 

Media and Cultural Literacy (MED-201)

Location: Various, distance learning format.
Length: 144 hours (8 weeks).
Dates: July 2011 - Present.
Objectives Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: describe and define mass and cultural landscape; explicate the historical significance of sounds and images; identify how media conveys messages through words and pictures; recognize the business of mass media; define U.S. democratic expression in mass media; outline how media impacts daily life of citizens; asses the ethical issues raised by the production of media; recite how visual culture has transformed the U.S.; apply critical thinking skills when discussing media; explain print revolution and increased use of the Internet; evaluate media and the law; recognize media's role in governance; assess mass media and cultural change; compare and contrast global effects of various types of media.
Instruction: Major topics covered in the course are: history and current state of mass communication in the U.S. from early newspapers and periodicals to the rise of the Internet and global media corporations; influence that mass media has had on culture and decisions; how to approach media from a critical thinking perspective. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments, class participation, and final exam.
Credit Recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Mass Communication, Media Studies, or as a Humanities elective (1/13).

Last Updated: November 18, 2014